Greenpeace Africa's Blog

Blogs from around Africa.

  • In Another Life

    Blogpost by Mike Baillie - October 7, 2012 at 15:48

    It’s the same faces on every tuna longline fishing boat we see. The young Indonesian men, the Vietnamese eyes under floppy hats, the Filipino guy hunched over a basket of fishing line. They reach out their hands and help us onto their boat. They’r... Read more >

  • Life Loves Living

    Blogpost by Mike Baillie - October 3, 2012 at 8:30 1 comment

    You’ll see it best on the darkest nights. When the moon is empty and clouds cover the stars – that’s when the ocean and algae collude. Like the Arctic’s Northern Lights, this is one of those natural phenomena that leave you giddy, wide-eyed in wonder:... Read more >

  • Promotion of clay stoves: Women lead the way in Koudiadiène

    Blogpost by Philippe Ahodékon, Greenpeace volunteer - October 2, 2012 at 12:12 1 comment

    This inspiring story of women in Koudiadiène, 80 km from Dakar, has now spread across the country of Senegal and continent of Africa. Identified by Greenpeace as part of its campaign to promote energy-efficient stoves and renewable energy sources, wom... Read more >

  • Something to be Saved

    Blogpost by Mike Baillie - October 2, 2012 at 10:35

    We’re about 200km off the coast of South Africa, sailing in the high seas of the Indian Ocean. During the night we caught up to a Spanish longliner, one of the many foreign vessels fishing in the region, others coming from places like Taiwan, Japan, a... Read more >

  • This is what APP’s new sustainability commitments look like

    Blogpost by Bustar Maitar - September 28, 2012 at 8:59

    Asia Pulp and Paper has spent the last few weeks telling customers around the world that the company’s latest sustainability pledges mean that this time, the changes the company has announced are genuine. To the untrained eye new pledges to stop fo... Read more >

  • How one company is getting away with a human and environmental tragedy

    Blogpost by Marietta Harjono - September 25, 2012 at 13:01

    Six years ago a multinational company bought large amounts of unrefined gasoline in the US and refined it through an industrial process called caustic washing onboard a ship, the Probo Koala, in the Mediterranean Sea.

    During one night in August 2006,... Read more >

  • Our environment, our heritage

    Blogpost by Hellen Dena - September 24, 2012 at 8:55

    Happy Heritage Day, South Africa!

    Heritage is defined as something we inherit or rather, something that’s passed down from generation to generation. For some people, Heritage Day means a time to respect their traditions, while for others it’s a tim... Read more >

  • Shark Finning isn’t News

    Blogpost by Mike Baillie - September 21, 2012 at 15:14 1 comment

    I saw six sharks being cut up for their fins yesterday. And as monstrous as it was, it won’t make headlines, it isn’t News: currently the fins of between 26 million and 73 million sharks are sold a year, that’s up to 8,000 sharks killed an hour. And t... Read more >

  • Inspecting Foreign Vessels in Mozambique Waters

    Blogpost by Mike Baillie - September 20, 2012 at 11:51

    The crew had been aboard the Japanese longliner for seven months. Mostly from Indonesia, the men didn’t speak much English, but a few did recognize the name ‘Greenpeace’. It was clear the ship had seen its fair share of fishing, but was still relative... Read more >

  • Protecting Noa’s Ark

    Blogpost by Mike Baillie - September 20, 2012 at 7:44

    Noa is a fisheries inspector from Mozambique, an easy-going man with soft features who really lights up if you talk to him about his work. He like’s to wear stripes. Mozambique’s ocean fisheries cover an area of almost 600,000 km2 and Noa is part of t... Read more >

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