Below are just some of the positive environmental changes that Greenpeace has directly helped to bring about since we began campaigning in 1971.

2014

December 2014: Lidl, the world's second largest discount supermarket, made a commitment to eliminate all hazardous chemicals from its textile production by 1 January, 2020. More

November 2014: The world's largest electronics retailer, Best Buy, announced major improvements to its paper supply chain to better protect Canada's Boreal Forest, one of the lungs of our planet and a vital buffer against climate change. During the busiest shopping time of the year Best Buy committed to stronger purchasing standards, paying particular attention to endangered forests and human rights. The move comes less than two weeks into a Greenpeace campaign that mobilized over 52,000 supporters across North America. More

October 2014: Just 48 hours after we revealed the toxic-truth behind their products, German retailer Tchibo has joined the ranks of companies committed to Detox. Tchibo has promised to make sure its products are toxic-free, beginning with clothes and shoes, but eventually extending to cover everything from frying pans to electronics! What's more, alongside committing to transform itself into a toxic-free champion, Tchibo has agreed to start developing 'closed-loop' production -tackling the very way its products are made. More

October 2014: After more than one million people respond to Greenpeace's Save the Arctic campaign LEGO ends its 50 year link with Shell. On it's website, LEGO published a statement committing to 'not renew the co-promotion contract with Shell'.

During Greenpeace's three month campaign, over a million people signed a petition calling on LEGO to stop promoting Shell's brand because of its plans to drill for oil in the pristine Arctic. In stark contrast to Shell, LEGO's policies include a commitment to produce more renewable energy than they use, phase out oil in their products and, in cooperation with its partners, leave a better world for future generations. And that's kind of a big deal. More

February 2014: Budget giant Primark becomes the 20th major clothing company to commit to Detox - agreeing to eliminate hazardous chemicals from its supply chain by 1 January 2020. From luxury houses like Burberry and Valentino to retailers like Primark, this latest victory shows how big brands are listening to the global calls for fashion without pollution and taking steps to create a toxic-free future. More

January 2014: British luxury brand Burberry made a commitment to eliminate the use of hazardous chemicals from its supply chain by 1 January 2020. Burberry's move comes after just two weeks of people-powered campaigning on the brand's social media channels, reaching an audience of millions, while Greenpeace volunteers held protests at stores from Beijing to Mexico City. Burberry joins 18 big brands like Zara, Valentino and H&M who have committed to Detox their clothes and manufacturing processes. More

2013

May 2013: Greenpeace applauds a decision from New Zealand fishing brand Sealord to remove a destructing fishing method from its supply chain of canned skipjack tuna by early 2014 and urges the wider industry to follow suit. Sealord's announcement is of great significance to the international Greenpeace campaign for sustainable tuna fishing and means all the big Australasian tuna brands have committed to phase out FAD-caught tunaMore

March 2013: The Supreme Court in Scotland denied Cairn Energy a permanent injunction against Greenpeace International following a Greenpeace UK protest at Cairn's headquarters in July 2011. More

March 2013: VW have caved in to pressure from across the globe and announced they will meet and support climate targets. VW has now publicly agreed to live up to its promises to be the world's greenest car company, setting an example for the rest of the industry. More

January 2013: The biggest global fashion brand based in Asia, Uniqlo, and its parent company Fast Retailing Group, today committed to eliminate all releases of hazardous chemicals throughout its entire global supply chain and products by 2020, in response to Greenpeace’s global Detox campaign. More

2012

December 2012: The world’s largest denim brand, Levi’s, committed to eliminate all releases of hazardous chemicals throughout its entire supply chain and products by 2020, following public pressure in response to Greenpeace’s global Detox campaign. More

December 2012: One of Australia’s leading canned fish manufacturer, John West (Simplot) has pledged to stop using destructive fishing methods that needlessly kill sharks, rays, baby tuna and turtles. The commitment means that John West will phase out the use of highly destructive and wasteful Fish Aggregating Devices (FADs) used with purse seine nets by 2015. More

December 2012: The government of South Korea has abandoned its plans to begin a ‘scientific’ whaling operation, a significant step forward in global efforts to protect whale populations. The proposed hunt would have caught minke whales for commercial purposes under the thin veil of scientific research. More than 100,000 people from around the world sent messages in the last month to the South Korean prime minister, asking him to call off the hunt. More

December 2012: Brazilian oil giant Petrobras has abandoned its plans for deep sea oil drilling off the coast of New Zealand. The world's third largest oil company has decided to return its exploration licenses for deep sea oil and gas prospects to the government, effectively abandoning its plans for deep sea drilling in New Zealand. More

November 2012: The world’s largest fashion retailer Zara – and parent company Inditex – today committed to eliminate all releases of hazardous chemicals throughout its entire supply chain and products by 2020, following public pressure in response to Greenpeace’s Detox campaign. Zara becomes the eighth brand to commit to eliminate releases of all hazardous chemicals throughout its supply chains and products since Greenpeace launched its Detox campaign in 2011. As a part of the commitment Zara is reinforcing the ban on APEOs, and pledges to set further short-term elimination timelines for other priority hazardous chemicals, including PFCs. Most notably, Zara will now require at least 20 suppliers to start releasing pollution discharge data by the end of March 2013, and at least 100 suppliers by the end of 2013. More

October 2012: M&S becomes the seventh brand to make a credible commitment to clean up its supply chain and products and eliminate all releases of hazardous chemicals, joining Puma, Nike, Adidas, H&M, C&A and Li-Ning. More brands need to respond to the urgency of the situation and take ambitious action to rid the fashion world and our precious water supplies of toxic chemicals. More

September 2012: Australian Federal Environment Minister Tony Burke has announced a ban on the Margiris super trawler for up to two years and further scientific investigations before boats like this are approved. Burke acknowledged overwhelming public concern in reaching this significant decision. Congratulations to the thousands of passionate Australians, community and environmental groups and fishing groups who stopped the Margiris from destroying Australia‘s oceans. More

Greenpeace also congratulated the Gillard government for showing the courage to prevent the Abel Tasman super trawler fishing in Australia's waters. Greenpeace hailed it as a victory for the Australian community which has united to reject this monster ship. The decision also sends a message to the global super-sized fishing fleets that world community opposition is growing to their unsustainable business model. 

The latest updates

 

Radioactivity in Japan’s Food and Water

Feature story | March 24, 2011 at 9:30

Following reports of radiation in food and radioactivity in Tokyo's water, we are calling for more effective protection of public health, and an immediate and transparent availability of information.

Nuclear Energy isn't Needed

Feature story | March 23, 2011 at 8:11

Greenpeace Executive Director Kumi Naidoo wrote the following opinion piece for the New York Times/International Herald Tribune.

Update: Fire Burns at Reactor 3 and Food Contamination Concerns Rise

Blog entry by Jess Miller | March 22, 2011

The Fukushima/Daiichi nuclear crisis continues, marked by confusion and a lack of information and transparency. Today, our team of nuclear experts and monitors followed reports of grey smoke coming out of the spent fuel pool of...

Video Q 'n A: The Fukushima Nulclear Crisis

Blog entry by Andrew Davies | March 19, 2011

In the midst of all that's going on in Japan, we managed to sit one of our (extremely busy) nuclear issue experts down and ask him a few of the top questions people have been asking.  If you don't find the answer you're looking for...

Fukushima update: Not yet in the clear

Blog entry by Andrew Davies | March 18, 2011

Overall, with possible exception of spent fuel pool of reactor #3, the status of all facilities is very similar to yesterday, which is a bad thing. Major uncertainty relates to amount of radiation already being released to air and...

Greenpeace Condemns SA's Nuclear Plans

Feature story | March 18, 2011 at 11:49

Greenpeace strongly condemns cabinet's decision to include 9 600 MW of additional nuclear energy into South Africa’s new energy plan -- this while Japan continues to struggle with a nuclear crisis after the devastating earthquake and tsunami last...

Suspended Jail Sentences for Peaceful Climate Protesters

Blog entry by EoinD | March 18, 2011

A Belgian court today gave ten Greenpeace activists a suspended one month jail sentence and fine for taking part in a climate action there in December 2009. This conviction is out of proportion to their peaceful protest, and an...

Fukushima Update: radiation levels remain high

Blog entry by Jess Miller | March 17, 2011

After days of news reporting one explosion after another at the Fukushima nuclear plant, there is finally a break in reports of new explosions. Radiation levels remain high around the plant. All efforts are being focused on...

Damage at Fukushima Nuclear Plant

Image | March 17, 2011 at 15:18

A handout photo shows Tokyo Electric Power Co. Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant reactor no. 4 (center) and no. 3 (L) in northern Japan March 15, 2011. Tokyo Electric Power.

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