The vast forest of the Congo Basin is the second largest tropical rainforest on earth and the lungs of Africa. Its incredibly rich and diverse ecosystem provides food, fresh water, shelter and medicine for tens of millions of people, and is home to many critically endangered species including forest elephants, gorillas, bonobos and okapis. Of the hundreds of mammal species discovered there so far, 39 are found nowhere else on Earth, and of its estimated 10,000 plant species, 3,300 are unique to the region.

The rainforest supports an astonishing range of life, within its teeming rivers, swamps and savannahs. But it also helps to sustain life across the whole planet. An estimated 8% of the earth’s carbon that is stored in living forests worldwide is stored in the forests of the DRC, making the country the fourth largest carbon reservoir in the world. The Congo Basin rainforest plays a critical role in regulating the global climate and halting runaway climate change, for the benefit of the entire biosphere.

But the forest, and the people and animals that depend upon it, are under threat as the unquenchable global thirst for natural resources, crops and foodstuffs means African lands are, more than ever, a target for investors. The solutions to these threats lie firmly with those who live there.

 

 

The latest updates

 

McKinsey Advice on Rainforest Schemes Fundamentally Flawed

Feature story | April 14, 2011 at 11:34

A new Greenpeace report Bad Influence has revealed how advice given to national governments by global consultancy firm McKinsey could lead to an increase in destructive logging practices in the DRC and other forested countries.

Greenpeace Calls for a Moratorium on FSC in the Congo

Publication | March 29, 2011 at 14:59

Greenpeace is calling for a complete moratorium on new FSC certifications in the Congo basin rainforest. This publication explains why a moratorium is a necessity.

Forest reform in the Democratic Republic of the Congo:

Publication | February 7, 2011 at 9:35

In January 2010, twenty-seven villagers from the province of Bandundu in the Democratic Republic of the Congo staged a sit-in protest against the operations of Sodefor – a subsidiary of industrial logging company Norsudtimber (NST) who holds...

Drought in the Amazon: What it Means

Blog entry by Dr. Janet Cotter, Greenpeace Science Unit | February 4, 2011

Severe drought could turn the Amazon rainforest into a source of carbon emissions contributing to climate change, rather than a carbon sink absorbing emissions. This is one of the alarming findings of a new study featured in ...

Greenpeace Extends its Sincere Condolences

Feature story | January 28, 2011 at 15:22

Greenpeace is saddened by the death of Charles Bopelo who passed away last Wednesday 26th around 2 PM in Oshwe, Bandundu Province, following a wound infection. He was buried on January 27th Thursday at around 10 AM in Oshwe.

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