7 results found
 

How Sinar Mas is expanding its empires of destruction

Publication | 29 July, 2010 at 2:25

Sinar Mas group is notorious for its destruction of millions of hectares of Indonesian rainforest, peatland and wildlife habitat. Two divisions within the group lead the destruction: pulp and palm oil. Recently, the group has diversified into coal.

Greenpeace letter to April

Publication | 5 February, 2013 at 10:10

APP, part of the Sinar Mas group, is one of just two global pulp and paper producers in Indonesia that has relied on rainforest fibre for its products used by household brands across the world. Greenpeace has today written to the CEO of APRIL...

Caught Red-Handed: How Nestlé's Use of Palm Oil is Having a Devastating Impact on...

Publication | 17 March, 2010 at 1:00

Nestlé's sourcing of palm oil from from the company Sinar Mas- responsible for destroying Indonesian rainforests and peatlands- threatens already endangered orang-utans with extinction and is accelerating climate change.

Protection Money

Publication | 23 November, 2010 at 10:00

How industry expansion plans would use climate funds to bankroll deforestation and undermine President Susilo Bambang Yudhoyono’s commitment to low-carbon development.

Greenpeace Briefing: Tropical Deforestation and the Kyoto Protocol, Sept 07

Publication | 24 September, 2007 at 2:00

The destruction of the world’s forests is one of the main causes of climate change, second only to the energy sector. Tropical forests contain up to 40 percent of the world's terrestrial carbon and play a powerful role in mitigating the growing...

Spotlight on the Illegal Timber Trade: Asia Pacific

Publication | 18 June, 2000 at 2:00

The few ancient forests in the countries of the Asia-Pacific region are under threat. In Laos, Vietnam and Taiwan, Thailand, Burma and Cambodia, at least 90 percent of large ancient forest has already been destroyed. Malaysia has lost 85 percent,...

Indonesia's Rainforests and Climate Change

Publication | 23 November, 2009 at 1:00

Forest destruction accounts for about a fifth of global greenhouse gas emissions, more than all the world’s trains, planes and cars put together; world leaders must agree a robust plan to end global deforestation before 2020.

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