Solutions

Indonesia’s plantation sector can – and must - make a genuine contribution to Indonesia’s development, rather than destroying the future for its people, its wildlife and the global climate on which we all depend.

Palm Oil

Greenpeace believes that palm oil can be produced responsibly. Palm oil production has been part of the livelihoods of local communities in Asia and Africa for decades, and can contribute both to economic development, while protecting forests and other ecosystems.

An example of this is the Dosan village on the Indonesian island of Sumatra. Palm oil producers, like the members of the Palm Oil Innovation Group, have shown that there is a business case for palm oil production that does not lead to forest destruction or violate the rights of local communities.

Greenpeace envisions palm oil production by local communities and industrial players that protects forests, and follows responsible agricultural practices while contributing to economic development and respecting the social, economic and cultural rights of local communities.

Pulp and Paper

Asia Pulp & Paper’s (APP) Forest Conservation Policy sets a model for the pulp and paper industry. In February 2013 Greenpeace suspended active campaigning against APP following the announcement of its  Forest Conservation Policy includes an immediate moratorium on all further forest clearance by all of its Indonesian suppliers while independent assessments are conducted to establish areas for protection.

If we are to turn the tide of forest destruction in Indonesia, we need many more companies to make commitments to end their role in deforestation. And we have to ensure that those companies that do make such commitments deliver on them.

Political Solutions

Greenpeace calls for permanent and full protection of forest and peatland, including a review concessions permits, governance and law enforcement, as well as the implementation of a responsible and just land-use planning system.

In May 2011, Indonesia introduced a two-year moratorium on permits for new concessions in primary forests and peatlands. While this moratorium was a welcome step in terms of the signals it sent, in practice most of the primary forests that it covers are already legally protected; the remainder are largely inaccessible and not under immediate threat of development.

More work needs to be done to harmonise spatial planning, develop sectoral policies and maps, as well as provide stronger law enforcement and mechanisms for resolving social conflicts.

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The latest updates

 

Palm oil companies say they’ll put forest destruction on hold. But what happens next?

Blog entry by Greenpeace Australia Pacific | 12 October, 2014

Some of the world’s biggest palm oil companies have suspended their forest destruction. Is this a ceasefire or the end of their war on forests? We refuse to stand by while palm oil companies turn forests to plantations. We started with...

Arrest of forest rights activists symbolic of what’s wrong in India

Blog entry by Greenpeace Australia Pacific | 19 August, 2014

It was just past midnight when Indian police hauled two Greenpeace India activists out of their sleep and arrested them this week as a crackdown on protests against a planned coal mine in the Mahan forest intensified. The arrests are the latest...

ROAR if you love tigers!

Blog entry by Rashini Suriyaarachchi | 29 July, 2014

Happy International Tiger Day! We’re always working to protect tiger habitats – but today we’re taking some time to celebrate these majestic animals and all the reasons they’re truly incredible. Tigers are ancient Respect your elders! Tigers...

6 myths this Indonesian logger didn’t want busted

Blog entry by Reece Turner | 10 July, 2014

A new study published last week shows Indonesia’s forests are disappearing faster than anywhere else in the world. This is alarming news. In Sumatra and Kalimantan, much of this destruction is in forested peatlands. Draining and clearing...

Johnson and Johnson: the path to ‘No More Tears’ in Indonesian rainforests

Blog entry by Greenpeace Australia Pacific | 5 May, 2014

It’s frustrating to think about the link between forest destruction and that bright yellow shampoo that miraculously allowed parents to wash their babies hair without igniting a burning-eyes meltdown. While human babies splashed around on their...

Consumer power! Procter & Gamble decides to wash its bad palm oil away

Blog entry by Alexandra Harris | 10 April, 2014

About 400,000 emails to Procter & Gamble CEO. Thousands of phone calls to P&G offices around the world. Dozens of protests throughout the planet. 7300 Sumatran orangutans at risk of being made homeless. As few as 400 tigers at risk of being made...

Winning! Colgate to end its role in forest destruction

Blog entry by Joao Talocchi | 25 March, 2014

Nearly 400,000 of you have written to P&G’s CEO. Dozens of protests have taken place in cities as diverse as Jakarta, Cincinnati and London. And thousands have taken to Facebook, Twitter and even their phones to tell P&G to clean up their act… …...

4 reasons we all should #StandForForests

Blog entry by Greenpeace Australia Pacific | 21 March, 2014

© Jan-Joseph Stok / Greenpeace We cannot sustain life without healthy, thriving forests. That is why Greenpeace campaigns for their protection and on this International Day of Forests, we want to share with you a few reasons why you should help.

Pulling back the shower curtain: Find out about P&G's dirty secret!

Feature Story | 27 February, 2014 at 16:30

Procter & Gamble claims that nearly 5 billion people use its products, among them the anti-dandruff shampoo Head & Shoulders. But what's not so squeaky clean is that P&G is making those billions of consumers unknowingly part of an environmental...

The movement for tiger-friendly products starts today. Are you in?

Feature Story | 12 February, 2014 at 15:11

Today we are asking you to take a stand to protect our forests.

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