Abandoned Buildings

Photo | March 5, 2012

(LEFT) Abandoned farms in Narodichi, a small town only a few kilometers away from the contaminated closed zone (zone-1). The village lies in zone-2, which means people are not allowed to move in from outside. Those already there can move away but many lack the resources to do so and do not have a place to go. The soil in and around the village is contaminated and crops grown here still cause sickness. From the government they get a mere 25 US cents per month to buy clean food. Chernobyl in the Ukraine became the site of the most infamous nuclear disaster accident of all. In 1986 the explosion of the nuclear reactor affected the lives of millions in Western Russia, Belarus and the Ukraine. Both countries have plans to build new reactors to export energy to Europe.

(RIGHT) Abandoned farms in Narodichi, a small town only a few kilometres away from the contaminated closed zone, zone-1. The village lies in zone-2, which means people are not allowed to move inside the zone. Those already living there can move away, but many lack the resources to do so and do not have a place to go. The contaminated soil in and around the village continues to produce crops that cause debilitating illnesses. The government provides the residents of Narodichi with a mere US $0.25 per month to buy clean food. (RIGHT) A depot sits abandoned and deteriorating in Tsushima, a village in the Namie district. Tsushima is one of the many villages near the exclusion zone around the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear plant. High radiation levels prevent workers from returning, causing further strain on the Japanese job market.

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