STATEMENT: B.C. dilbit tanker ban a “major blow” to Kinder Morgan

Press release - January 30, 2018
30 January 2018 (VANCOUVER) — Earlier today, the B.C. government announced the development of a series of new oil spill response measures, including a proposal to restrict the increased transport of bitumen while a scientific panel determines the impacts of spills on aquatic environments.

30 January 2018 (VANCOUVER) — Earlier today, the B.C. government announced the development of a series of new oil spill response measures, including a proposal to restrict the increased transport of bitumen while a scientific panel determines the impacts of spills on aquatic environments.

In response, Greenpeace Canada Climate & Energy Campaigner, Mike Hudema, said:

“Today’s announcement is a major blow to Kinder Morgan. The province is proposing what is, in essence, a temporary moratorium on new bitumen exports. We know bitumen and water don’t mix; when the scientific panel comes to the same conclusion, Kinder Morgan will be the owner of a brand new pipeline with no ‘on’ switch. We’re encouraged to see the B.C. government taking this step to protect marine life, as well as the jobs and livelihoods that depend on an oil-free coast.

“A tanker spill on the ocean, like the Paris-sized spill caused by the Sanchi tanker earlier this month, would be virtually impossible to clean up and the impacts could last decades. A spill from just one of the 400-plus tankers from Kinder Morgan's proposed pipeline would devastate the coast. Despite these known risks, the National Energy Board did not consider the most up-to-date scientific assessment of bitumen's impacts on marine life when it approved Kinder Morgan’s new pipeline. We hope the scientific panel the B.C. government announced today will correct this error and bring sorely lacking evidence-based decision-making to the fore.

“Kinder Morgan’s investors and funders, including TD Bank, JPMorgan Chase, Barclay’s and Desjardins, should interpret today’s decision as a major warning sign. Funnelling billions into an export pipeline with a tanker moratorium in place does not make good business sense; it spells more risk and potential losses for shareholders. Smart investors shouldn’t be putting their money into controversial dirty energy projects.”

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Contact:

Jesse Firempong, Greenpeace Canada, Communications Officer, 778-996-6549,