Arctic

© Greenpeace / Christian Åslund

What at the first glance looks like a cold and barren north is really a treasure of life and beauty, home to people and amazing wildlife.

The Arctic and subarctic regions are home to approximately 30 different peoples with unique cultures and traditions. The Indigenous Peoples in the Arctic, many of them called Inuit, inhabit the most northern regions of North America, Asia and Greenland. Although modern times have changed the everyday life in the Arctic, people in the region still live in very close connection with and depend on their natural environment and the Arctic wildlife.

Walruses, narwhals and polar bears are possibly the most iconic animals to be found in the Arctic, and they provide examples of how beautiful, unique and diverse the Arctic wildlife is. Life in the Arctic forms a complex and sensitive ecosystem. Canada’s Arctic sector covers 1,425,000 square kilometers and is home to many Inuit, First Nations, Dene, Métis and non-Indigenous communities. After Greenland, the Canadian Arctic Archipelago is the world’s largest high-Arctic land area.

But the Arctic is not only home to people and wildlife. It affects the lives of many even far away. By regulating our climate and reflecting much of the sunlight back into space, the Arctic acts like a refrigerator for the northern hemisphere and strongly influences weather patterns all around the world.

Rising temperatures caused by climate change rapidly alter the face of the Arctic, bringing new risks and big challenges for the environment and wildlife, as well as for people in the Arctic and all around the world.

Greenpeace has mobilized over five million people to take a stand and help ensure the protection this frozen treasure so desperately needs. For more information: SavetheArctic.org

The latest updates

 

An Urgent Call to President Putin to defend the rights of the Indigenous Peoples of...

Blog entry by Jon Burgwald | November 14, 2012 1 comment

We’re hearing outrageously troubling news from Russia today: an ally in the struggle to protect the Arctic and the largest association of Indigenous Peoples of Russia has been ordered by the Russian government to close its doors. ...

Guess who Shell thinks is a major 'challenge' to their Arctic plans? You.

Blog entry by James Turner | November 7, 2012 1 comment

We found more proof that Shell is getting seriously worried about our new movement to save the Arctic. Last month in Brussels Shell’s senior Arctic advisor, Robert Blaauw, presented the company’s plans at a conference called "Arctic...

Want to experience climate change ? Visit the North…

Blog entry by Kiera Kolson | October 31, 2012 3 comments

You may think  the Arctic is mostly unpopulated, given that in some areas you could travel for weeks without seeing a soul. But the staggering increase of the world’s population is putting a lot of pressure on the pristine ice, lands...

Radiohead, the Arctic, and Me

Blog entry by Patrick Bonin | October 19, 2012 3 comments

I can still remember the first Radiohead song that burrowed its way into my brain: “Creep,” their début single, released in 1992. Good times! The world was changing. The Berlin Wall had just been toppled. The Rio Earth Summit, with the...

Totally saying no to Arctic oil

Blog entry by Diego Creimer | September 26, 2012 3 comments

"Oil on Greenland would be a disaster." "Energy companies should not drill for crude in Arctic waters." "The risk of an oil spill in such an environmentally sensitive area is simply too high." Sounds familiar? Today, it’s not...

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