Arctic

© Greenpeace / Christian Åslund

The Arctic is a treasure of life and beauty, home to millions of people and amazing wildlife.

Approximately 30 different peoples with unique cultures and traditions call the Arctic and subarctic regions “home”. The Indigenous Peoples in the Arctic, many of them Inuit, inhabit the most northern regions of North America, Eurasia and Greenland. Modern times have brought great change to life in the Arctic, but many people still live in very close connection with the land and depend on their natural environment and the Arctic wildlife.

Walruses, narwhals, Arctic foxes, beluga whales and polar bears are among the most iconic animals to be found in the Arctic, and they provide examples of the beauty, uniqueness and diversity of Arctic wildlife. Life in the Arctic forms a complex and delicate ecosystem.

Canada’s Arctic sector covers 1,425,000 square kilometers and is home to many Inuit, First Nations, Dene, Métis and non-Indigenous communities. After Greenland, the Canadian Arctic Archipelago is the world’s largest high-Arctic land area.

What happens in the Arctic also affects the lives of people far away. Arctic ice and snow help regulate our climate by reflecting incoming sunlight back into space, acting like a refrigerator for the planet. Arctic permafrost stores massive amounts of carbon, and as it thaws this carbon gets released and threatens to push global warming completely out of control. Melting Arctic ice on land raises global sea levels and could drown coastal communities and small island nations. The Arctic also influences weather patterns for the northern hemisphere.

Rising temperatures caused by climate change are rapidly altering the face of the Arctic, bringing new risks and big challenges for the environment and wildlife, as well as for people in the Arctic and all around the world.

Greenpeace has mobilized over seven million people to take a stand and help ensure the protection desperately needed at the top of the world. To add your voice sign the petition at SavetheArctic.org

The latest updates

 

Hope is in the eye of the protester

Blog entry by Diego Creimer | May 27, 2015

People in Clyde River, Coastal First Nations in British Columbia and kayaktivists on the West Coast, what do these people have in common? They are evidence of the growing global rebellion against the dangers of Arctic oil. ...

It’s time to say yes to people, not to oil

Blog entry by Diego Creimer, Greenpeace Canada | May 20, 2015

This Tuesday, an unprecedented journey started on the shores of Vancouver. For the first time ever, six people from as many First Nations set sail on board the Greenpeace ship MY Esperanza to Haida Gwaii, to help connect coastal...

Nunavut zhit Russian khehkaiʼ, Chuu Choo gwidiʼ gwaʼan nan ghaiʼ eenjit ginjih...

Blog entry by Alex Speers-Roesch | May 20, 2015

Tadhaa Zrii nanh, Iqaluit, Nunavut gwizhit Greenpeace dinjiinat łigaajil, Nikolay Rochev, Izvatas gwichit diiyah nilih, aii Izhma Komi kat guuveenjit trʼigiinkheʼ. Aii Izhma Komi dinjii ka, Russian Chuu Choo gwidiʼ gwitsʼat dinjii...

The People Vs. Oil

Blog entry by Inderjit Deogun | May 15, 2015

Even before Shell’s oil rig, the 400-foot-tall Polar Pioneer, arrived in Seattle it was met with outrage. Six Greenpeace volunteers protested Shell’s plans to drill in the Arctic by boarding the vessel en route. The bold individuals...

ᐅᓛᓯᐊᒥᐅᑦ ᓄᓇᖃᖅᑐᑐᖃᖅ ᓯᕗᓕᐅᖅᑎᖓ ᐅᖃᐅᓯᖃᖅᐳᖅ ᐅᑭᐅᖅᑕᖅᑐᒥ ᐅᖅᓱᐊᓗᓕᕆᓂᕐᒥᒃ ᓄᓇᕗᒻᒥ

Blog entry by ᑎᑎᕋᖅᑕᖏᑦ ᐊᓕᒃ ᔅᐱᐅᔅ−ᕉᔅ, ᐅᑭᐅᖅᑕᖅᑐᒥ ᑐᓴᐅᒪᔭᐅᑎᑦᑎᔨᖓᑦ | May 12, 2015

ᐃᓱᖅᐸᓯᐊᓂ ᐄᐳᒥ, ᒍᓖᓐᐲᓯᒃᑯᑦ ᑲᑎᒪᑎᑦᑎᓚᐅᕐᒪᑕ ᐅᓂᒃᑲᖅᑎᑦᑎᓗᑎᒃ ᐃᖃᓗᖕᓂ, ᓄᓇᕗᒥ, ᑕᐃᔅᓱᒥᖓ ᓂᑯᓚᐃ ᕋᑦᓯᐊᕝᒥᒃ, ᐊᖓᔪᖄᕆᔭᐅᔪᖅ ᐃᔅᕚᑕᔅᓯᒃᑯᓐᓄᑦ, ᑲᑐᔾᔨᖃᑎᒌᖑᔪᑦ ᐱᔪᓐᓇᐅᑎᓕᕆᓂᕐᒧᑦ ᐃᓄᖁᑎᖏᓐᓄᑦ ᐃᔅᒫᒥ, ᑰᒥᒥᒃ. ᑕᐃᒃᑯᐊ ᐃᔅᒪᒥ ᑰᒦᑦ ᓄᓇᖃᖅᑐᑐᖃᐅᖕᒪᑕ ᐅᓛᓯᐊᒥᐅᑦ ᐅᑭᐅᖅᑕᖅᑐᖅᐸᓯᐊᑕ ᓄᓇᖏᓐᓂ. ᐃᓅᓯᖏᑦ ᐱᓗᐊᖅᑐᒥᒃ ᑐᖓᕕᖃᖅᑐᑦ...

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