Energy [R]evolution

Icebergs from glaciers display alarming signs of increased melt and flow rate in Greenland. © Nick Cobbing / Greenpeace

Greenpeace pressures the federal government and mobilizes Canadians to demand action on climate change. We have developed a comprehensive Energy [R]evolution for Canada that outlines a green energy future that challenges this country’s current destructive energy scenario. Become part of the Canadian Energy [R]evolution and fight climate change by supporting renewable energy.

Climate change is a reality, and it’s caused by human activity: the burning of fossil fuels. Climate change has a serious effect on the environment and people. Experts estimate hundreds of thousands of people die annually from the effects of climate change. Global warming causes glaciers to melt, sea levels to rise, extreme weather and habitat loss.

Climate scientists agree that global greenhouse gas emissions must peak by 2015 and then drop significantly to keep the increase in the average global temperature to less than 2 degrees C and avoid catastrophic climate change.

How Greenpeace works to stop climate change

  • Targeting offenders: We take direct action against operations in the tar sands.
  • Pressuring governments: We confront the federal and Alberta governments and urge them to stop promoting the dirty oil of the tar sands and do more to tackle climate change. We pressure the federal government to make its target for reducing greenhouse gas emissions by 2020 stronger.
  • Mobilizing Canadians: We inspire Canadians—150,000 and counting—to join us in demanding action on climate change from the federal government.
  • Offering energy alternatives: We urge Canada to invest in green energy. The Greenpeace Energy [R]evolution for Canada and other Energy [R]evolution reports show how a green energy system and higher energy efficiency can address climate change.

The latest updates

 

What does the giant Arctic camel tell us about climate change?

Blog entry by Ben Ayliffe | March 7, 2013

In my line of work the chances to flex my paleontological muscles are few and far between, which is why the news from scientists that they’ve discovered the remains of a giant camel that lived in Canada’s high Arctic millions of...

Premier Redford: Let's be honest about the tar sands

Blog entry by Mike Hudema | February 28, 2013 2 comments

Dear Premier Redford, As a fellow Albertan who loves this province and its natural environment, I was quite disappointed to read your op-ed in USA Today . One of the main qualities I look for in a leader is honesty. Honesty in...

What would the Enbridge pipeline hearings be like if we heard the truth?

Blog entry by Keith Stewart | February 8, 2013

The tar sands may be visible from space but they have been rendered invisible to the environmental review panel assessing Enbridge’s Northern Gateway pipeline.  That’s an impressive feat, as it ensures that the review panel won’t...

Leaked Arctic Council oil spill agreement weak and puts Canadians at risk

Feature story | February 4, 2013 at 7:00

On the eve of the Arctic Council environment ministers' meeting in Jukkasjärvi, Sweden, a leaked copy of the Council’s oil spill response agreement entitled, “Co-operation on Marine Oil Pollution Preparedness and Response in the Arctic” reveals...

Orcas freed from the ice, but an uncertain climate future awaits them

Blog entry by Charles Latimer | January 10, 2013 1 comment

A pod of orcas have finally escaped from what was seen as an increasingly precarious situation. The heartbreaking images of orcas trapped in the ice have been shared around the world as people grew more and more concerned of the danger...

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