stop pipelines

Tar sands

Aerial view of Syncrude Aurora tar sands mine in the Boreal Forest north of Fort McMurray. © Greenpeace / Jiri Rezac

The tar sands are huge deposits of bitumen, a tar-like substance that’s turned into oil through complex and energy-intensive processes that cause widespread environmental damage. These processes pollute the Athabasca River, lace the air with toxins and convert farmland into wasteland. Large areas of the Boreal forest are clearcut to make way for development in the tar sands, the fastest growing source of greenhouse gas emissions in Canada.

Greenpeace is also concerned with the social and health costs of the tar sands. First Nations communities in the tar sands report unusually high levels of rare cancers and autoimmune diseases. Their traditional way of life is threatened. Substance abuse, suicide, gambling and family violence have increased in the tar sands region. Meanwhile, the thousands of workers brought in by oil companies face the boom and bust cycles of the oil economy rollercoaster.

Tar sands companies want to build new pipelines so that they can expand output in the tar sands. These pipelines would threaten thousands of rivers and streams across the country. The increased tanker traffic required to carry this oil would threaten our coastlines. Oil spills would devastate communities and existing livelihoods that depend on a health environment, while the greenhouse gas emissions from producing and burning the oil would fuel climate change.

We have better alternatives.  

How Greenpeace works to stop the tar sands

  • Pressuring governments: The governments of Alberta and Canada actively promote tar sands development and ignore international commitments Canada has made to cut greenhouse gas emissions. Through direct action, we draw international attention to government climate crimes in the tar sands and demand change.
  • Educating shareholders: We meet with Canadian and international shareholders in oil companies and discuss and expose the investment risks associated with tar sands development.
  • Working with impacted communities: We reach out to landowners and First Nations affected by the tar sands amplify their voices and stand in solidarity with them.

The latest updates

 

Tutu Calls on Canada to be a Climate Leader

Blog entry by Tzeporah Berman & Monica Davies | December 2, 2011

The advert that appeared in numerous Canadian newspapers this week, condemning Canada's weak position against climate change and its proximity to big oil companies.   During the COP17 climate talks earlier in the week, it was...

First Nations reaffirm commitment to stop tar sands pipeline and tankers on...

Blog entry by Melina Laboucan-Massimo | December 1, 2011

December 1 st marks the one-year anniversary of the signing of the Save the Fraser Declaration . Today in Vancouver the Yinka Dene Alliance is holding a press conference to commemorate the precedent-setting declaration, which took...

EXPOSED: Canada's secret tar sands lobbying of UK ministers

Blog entry by petespeller | November 28, 2011

View of smoke plumes emitted from the Syncrude upgrader plant north of Fort McMurray. Credit: Jiri Rezac / Greenpeace Documents obtained by The Cooperative and Friends of the Earth Europe through Freedom of...

Victory (for now) on the Keystone XL tar sands pipeline!

Blog entry by Keith Stewart | November 10, 2011

Remember that massive tar sands pipeline that so many people were concerned enough about that they were willing to risk getting arrested over in both Canada and the US ? Well, Stephen Harper may have thought it was a “no brainer” ,...

A dark day for the dirty energy

Blog entry by Keith Stewart | October 4, 2011 1 comment

Spare a brief moment of pity for the people trying to make a profit off of polluting the planet because today was an all-too-rare bad day for them. First, an astroturf (fake grassroots) campaign to slam green energy and promote coal...

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