Great Bear Rainforest

The spirit bear (also known as Kermode Bear) makes its home in the Great Bear Rainforest. © Andrew Wright / www.cold-coast.com

Greenpeace fought for a decade to ensure greater protection for the magnificent Great Bear Rainforest, and continues to work with the B.C. government and other partners to ensure the forest’s long-term sustainability.

Stretching along the coast from Vancouver to Alaska, the Great Bear Rainforest is the largest tract of intact coastal temperate rainforest in the world. The forest was threatened by industrial logging and mining. Habitat for elk, eagles and bears was being destroyed.

On March 31, 2009, the B.C. government announced the preservation of 50 per cent of the Great Bear Rainforest, following through on part of its 2006 promise to protect 70 per cent. Greenpeace, our environmental partners, the B.C. government, First Nations and logging companies celebrated. The B.C. government called the agreement the “most significant environmental announcement in the province’s history.” We agree.

The Great Bear Rainforest agreement also includes more restrictive logging regulations, recognizes First Nations as governments and supports sustainable development in First Nations communities. Although many parts of the plan are being implemented, Greenpeace’s campaign to protect the rainforest is not over. The B.C. government has committed to setting aside 70 per cent of the natural level of old growth forest by 2014. We will make sure it does.

How Greenpeace protects the Great Bear Rainforest

  • Exposing environmental problems: We cast a spotlight on industrial projects that threaten the health of the rainforest.
  • Engaging in solutions-based discussions: We are involved in ongoing discussions with our environmental partners, First Nations, the forestry industry and the B.C. government. Learn more about this global solution in the making.
  • Pressuring the marketplace: We communicate with companies that buy wood from the rainforest, urging them to use their purchasing power to influence logging practices. We encourage Forest Stewardship Council certification for logging companies.
  • Supporting communities: We support First Nations in their efforts to diversify their economies and increase their governance over their traditional territories.
  • Advocating for wildlife and ecosystems: Species in the rainforest are at risk of extinction despite commitments in the agreement. We push for the conservation of habitat.

The latest updates

 

The Great Bear Rainforest and the continued threat of Enbridge's Northern Gateway...

Blog entry by Eduardo Sousa and Christine Leclerc | November 29, 2011

For more than a decade Greenpeace and its partner conservation organizations, First Nations, the government of British Columbia (B.C.) and the forest products industry has been trying to implement a set of agreements aimed at...

It's time to finish the job to protect the Great Bear Rainforest!

Blog entry by Christine Leclerc | November 21, 2011

The government of British Columbia is being reminded of its obligation to increase protection of the Great Bear Rainforest with FINISH THE JOB posters going up in Vancouver and Victoria. The Great Bear Rainforest is the...

First Independent Assessment of the Canadian Boreal Forest Agreement Released

Blog entry by Mélissa Filion - Forêt | November 14, 2011

How is the Boreal Agreement delivering on its promises ? The Canadian Boreal Forest Agreement, of which Greenpeace is a signatory along with eight other environmental organizations and 22 logging companies, has recently released...

Burning trees for energy puts Canadian forests and climate at risk: Greenpeace

Feature story | November 2, 2011 at 10:10

Greenpeace released a science-based report today that highlights the dangers of the large-scale use of wood and tree harvesting for heating, electricity generation or liquid biofuels. The report, entitled ‘Fuelling a Biomess’, argues that burning...

Asia Pulp & Paper warns of “aggressive” Canadian takeover

Blog entry by Shane Moffatt | July 21, 2011

It’s official: Asia Pulp & Paper (APP) has “aggressive plans” to expand into Canada, according to a recent article in Pulp and Paper Canada . In an ominous turn of phrase, APP Americas interim head, Terry Hunley, warns that the...

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