Oceans

Life on our blue planet depends on healthy oceans, but recent reports warn that sea life faces the next mass extinction. Next to climate change, overfishing is the single greatest threat to marine biodiversity. Industrial fishing has reduced populations of large, predatory fish like tuna, cod and sharks by about ninety per cent in the last fifty years. Growing demand for seafood, wasteful fishing practices and mismanaged fish stocks and aquaculture operations are leading to broken links in marine food chains in Canadian waters and worldwide. Urgent action is needed to protect marine life and allow recovery. Greenpeace works to relieve pressure on ocean ecosystems and to establish a network of no-take marine reserves–ocean parks–covering 40 per cent of the world's oceans.

Tuna

Tuna

Greenpeace urges major canned tuna brands across the country to source only ocean-friendly tuna. Greenpeace also exposes brands unwilling to change their destructive ways. Tuna companies must stop sourcing tuna from overfished stocks and wasteful fisheries that kill far more than just the tuna in your can. Often sharks, rays, sea turtles and baby tuna from vulnerable stocks are caught through wasteful fishing methods. Much of the tuna on Canadian supermarket shelves is still caught by destructive methods, but a sea change is underway.Every year, Greenpeace ranks 14 of the largest tuna companies in Canada. See how they stack-up.

Supermarkets

Sustainable Seafood Markets

Greenpeace is calling on Canada’s major supermarkets to green how they source seafood and become ocean advocates. With sustainable seafood policies now in place with every major chain in Canada, Greenpeace pushes for an end to selling redlist seafood and irresponsible procurement practices. As the middlemen between consumers and seafood producers, supermarkets play a pivotal role in cleaning up the supply chain and pushing for positive change in our oceans.

 

The latest updates

 

It’s time for fewer tuna fishing boats, not empty promises

Blog entry by Sari Tolvanen | June 13, 2012

There is consensus. Too many big tuna fishing boats are chasing declining tuna populations. Environmentalists know this; the tuna industry knows it and governments, scientists and fishermen know that if we want fish tomorrow, we...

Clover Leaf: how about a switch to ocean-friendly tuna on Oceans Day?

Blog entry by Sarah King, Oceans campaign coordinator | June 8, 2012

Today, on World Oceans Day, a shark and some Greenpeace volunteers took to the streets to ask Vancouverites to urge Clover Leaf, Canada's largest brand of unsustainable tuna, to honour the day by committing to switch to sourcing only...

World Oceans Day

Blog entry by Charles Latimer - Oceans Campaigner | June 8, 2012

Established during the first Rio conference in 1992, World Oceans Day is, 20 years later, an opportunity for us to look at the state of this important ecosystem. Oceans give life  Even though our oceans represent three...

Why an oceans rescue plan must be agreed at Rio

Blog entry by Richard Page, Greenpeace International | May 27, 2012

It’s only a few weeks until the Rio+20 Earth Summit and although the countdown has started, the world’s politicians still don’t understand that our long-term future is at stake. Our future depends on protecting the global...

New allies in the oceans revolution

Blog entry by Sari Tolvanen | May 22, 2012

Over the past few years we’ve seen increased consumer demand for sustainable tuna products. At the moment, the best option on the shelves is pole and line caught skipjack tuna , the population of which is still relatively plentiful...

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