Oceans

Life on our blue planet depends on healthy oceans, but recent reports warn that sea life faces the next mass extinction. Next to climate change, overfishing is the single greatest threat to marine biodiversity. Industrial fishing has reduced populations of large, predatory fish like tuna, cod and sharks by about ninety per cent in the last fifty years. Growing demand for seafood, wasteful fishing practices and mismanaged fish stocks and aquaculture operations are leading to broken links in marine food chains in Canadian waters and worldwide. Urgent action is needed to protect marine life and allow recovery. Greenpeace works to relieve pressure on ocean ecosystems and to establish a network of no-take marine reserves–ocean parks–covering 40 per cent of the world's oceans.

Tuna

Tuna

Greenpeace urges major canned tuna brands across the country to source only ocean-friendly tuna. Greenpeace also exposes brands unwilling to change their destructive ways. Tuna companies must stop sourcing tuna from overfished stocks and wasteful fisheries that kill far more than just the tuna in your can. Often sharks, rays, sea turtles and baby tuna from vulnerable stocks are caught through wasteful fishing methods. Much of the tuna on Canadian supermarket shelves is still caught by destructive methods, but a sea change is underway.Every year, Greenpeace ranks 14 of the largest tuna companies in Canada. See how they stack-up.

Supermarkets

Sustainable Seafood Markets

Greenpeace is calling on Canada’s major supermarkets to green how they source seafood and become ocean advocates. With sustainable seafood policies now in place with every major chain in Canada, Greenpeace pushes for an end to selling redlist seafood and irresponsible procurement practices. As the middlemen between consumers and seafood producers, supermarkets play a pivotal role in cleaning up the supply chain and pushing for positive change in our oceans.

 

The latest updates

 

United we sail – Mauritian fishermen, Greenpeace protest against overfishing

Blog entry by Oliver Knowles | May 12, 2013

This week, politicians, scientists and fisheries managers from around the world are coming to Mauritius to attend the annual Indian Ocean Tuna Commission (IOTC) meeting. This organisation is charged by governments to protect tuna...

Buyer beware of canned tuna "gone gory"

Blog entry by Sarah King, Oceans campaign coordinator | April 19, 2013

If you’ve been on facebook the past couple of days perhaps you’ve seen Greenpeace’s image of our 2013 canned tuna sustainability ranking results. Turns out over 88,000 and counting already have, and upwards of 1000 facebookers have...

Greenpeace volunteers across Canada survey tuna sustainability

Blog entry by Natalie Caine | April 4, 2013

Greenpeace Canada has supporters and volunteers across Canada that are invaluable to our success.  People that support and take actions on our campaigns online and offline, donate to Greenpeace and participate in our volunteer programs...

Fishing for answers from Dongwon

Blog entry by Sari Tolvanen | March 14, 2013

We know that the industrial fishing industry can often skirt the law in search of profits. In my decade of campaigning to rescue our oceans, I have seen dozens of ships fishing illegally, seen fish hidden in the inner bowels of fishing...

Safeway brand greener canned tuna in stores now!

Blog entry by Sarah King, Oceans campaign coordinator | January 28, 2013

After months of anticipation, Canada Safeway has officially unveiled its new line of SAFEWAY brand canned skipjack (chunk light and flaked light) tuna. And why should you fellow ocean-lovers care? Because the skipjack isn’t sourced...

26 - 30 of 213 results.

Topics