Sustainable Seafood Markets

A pile of freshly caught fish on-board the 'Reiderland'. This German pair trawler is bottom trawling for North Sea Cod. © Greenpeace / Christian Aslund

Greenpeace targets supermarkets across the country in an effort to convince them to stop selling Redlist seafood—the most destructively fished or farmed species—and develop policies for greener seafood. As the middlemen between the oceans and the consumer, supermarkets play a pivotal role in the destruction of our oceans and have an opportunity to protect them.

Each of the 21 species on Greenpeace’s Redlist is there because it meets a strict set of criteria that evaluate stock status, species vulnerability and the environmental impacts of fishing methods. There are different sets of criteria for farmed and wild species. 

Marine ecosystems have suffered a terrible toll from decades of industrial fishing. About three-quarters of global fish stocks are fished at capacity or overfished. Ninety per cent of large, predatory species have disappeared. In Canada, cod has all but vanished. To ensure oceans recover and fish are sustained, overfishing and other destructive practices must end. 

How Greenpeace works to ensure fish for the future

Challenging the marketplace: Our supermarket campaign takes direct action at Canadian grocery chains to convince them to stop selling Redlist fish and improve seafood labelling. To track progress, Greenpeace produces an annual ranking of Canada’s supermarkets.

  • Working with retailers: Greenpeace works with supermarkets to help them create more sustainable seafood procurement policies and push for more sustainable fisheries and better certification.
  • Informing consumers: We reach out to consumers through our actions, and invite them to educate themselves by reading our ranking and other materials.
  • Pressuring the government: We lobby federal politicians to demand responsible fisheries management and to create no-take areas in marine reserves. Greenpeace is part of a coalition that has sued the Canadian government for stronger regulations to protect our marine species at risk.

The latest updates

 

My week on a plastic beach helping to name and shame its polluters

Blog entry by Sarah King, Senior oceans strategist | October 4, 2017

It was more devastating than I imagined, and that’s saying something considering the descriptions and pictures I’ve been exposed to over the years. The plastic pollution covering Freedom Island in Metro Manila, Philippines is...

Winning on the world’s largest tuna company and what it means for the oceans

Blog entry by Sarah King | July 11, 2017

It took two years of relentless campaigning and nearly 700,000 concerned people from around the world , but today we are sharing the good news that together we convinced the world’s largest tuna company to clean up its act! Tuna...

2017 Tuna Ranking reveals more green tuna products but not enough green tuna aisles

Blog entry by Sarah King, Senior oceans strategist | July 5, 2017 2 comments

Our 2017 Canned Tuna Sustainability Ranking is out and with it comes more intel than ever before about the state of canned tuna aisles in well-known supermarket chains across Canada. There’s some good and some bad news to share, but...

Share Your Photos of Coke’s Plastic Pollution

Blog entry by Sarah King | May 29, 2017 1 comment

Coca-Cola is the biggest producer of plastic bottles in the world, producing over 100 billion plastic bottles every year. But Coke isn't taking responsibility for the huge amount of single-use plastic it’s producing - and...

5 Reasons Why We Visited Coca-Cola's HQ

Blog entry by Louisa Casson, Greenpeace UK | April 26, 2017 2 comments

On April 9th, Greenpeace installed a piece of art right on the doorstep of Coca-Cola’s European office in London (UK), to hold the soft drinks giant accountable for ocean plastic pollution. As the world’s largest soft drinks...

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