Sustainable Seafood Markets

A pile of freshly caught fish on-board the 'Reiderland'. This German pair trawler is bottom trawling for North Sea Cod. © Greenpeace / Christian Aslund

Greenpeace targets supermarkets across the country in an effort to convince them to stop selling Redlist seafood—the most destructively fished or farmed species—and develop policies for greener seafood. As the middlemen between the oceans and the consumer, supermarkets play a pivotal role in the destruction of our oceans and have an opportunity to protect them.

Each of the 21 species on Greenpeace’s Redlist is there because it meets a strict set of criteria that evaluate stock status, species vulnerability and the environmental impacts of fishing methods. There are different sets of criteria for farmed and wild species. 

Marine ecosystems have suffered a terrible toll from decades of industrial fishing. About three-quarters of global fish stocks are fished at capacity or overfished. Ninety per cent of large, predatory species have disappeared. In Canada, cod has all but vanished. To ensure oceans recover and fish are sustained, overfishing and other destructive practices must end. 

How Greenpeace works to ensure fish for the future

Challenging the marketplace: Our supermarket campaign takes direct action at Canadian grocery chains to convince them to stop selling Redlist fish and improve seafood labelling. To track progress, Greenpeace produces an annual ranking of Canada’s supermarkets.

  • Working with retailers: Greenpeace works with supermarkets to help them create more sustainable seafood procurement policies and push for more sustainable fisheries and better certification.
  • Informing consumers: We reach out to consumers through our actions, and invite them to educate themselves by reading our ranking and other materials.
  • Pressuring the government: We lobby federal politicians to demand responsible fisheries management and to create no-take areas in marine reserves. Greenpeace is part of a coalition that has sued the Canadian government for stronger regulations to protect our marine species at risk.

The latest updates

 

Vaquita Success! New Protections Could Save This Endangered Porpoise

Blog entry by Phil Kline | July 27, 2016

With only 60 animals remaining, the vaquita porpoise is on the brink of extinction. That's why 150,000 Greenpeace supporters have stood up to save this shy, beautiful animal. And the Mexican government just announced new protections...

Trudeau Government Approves Dumping of Toxic Chemical In Our Oceans

Blog entry by Alex Speers-Roesch | July 27, 2016

Take action now: Email Minister McKenna to tell her to keep COREXIT banned in Canada.   I’ve got bad news. Canada’s new Environment Minister Catherine McKenna has approved the use of the toxic chemical dispersant COREXIT when...

Cats love tuna, just a little too much

Blog entry by Kate Simcock | May 18, 2016

Every day, all around the world, people and their pets eat tuna sourced from a Thai seafood conglomerate that has been condemned for destructive fishing methods and a connection to slave labour, including the locking of indentured...

Iceland's fin whale hunt cancelled for 2016

Blog entry by Willie Mackenzie | February 29, 2016

No endangered fin whales will be hunted in Iceland this year. This is great news. Word from colleagues in Iceland, and now reports in both Icelandic and  English-language media  confirm that the planned hunt for fin whales will not...

Saving the last Japanese dugongs

Blog entry by Karli Thomas, Oceans Campaigner at Greenpeace NZ | November 6, 2015

The home of the last few Japanese dugongs is about to be landfilled to make way for two airstrips - part of the expansion of a US military base on the island of Okinawa. But a movement nearly 18 years old is standing up to say NO.

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