Sustainable Seafood Markets

A pile of freshly caught fish on-board the 'Reiderland'. This German pair trawler is bottom trawling for North Sea Cod. © Greenpeace / Christian Aslund

Greenpeace targets supermarkets across the country in an effort to convince them to stop selling Redlist seafood—the most destructively fished or farmed species—and develop policies for greener seafood. As the middlemen between the oceans and the consumer, supermarkets play a pivotal role in the destruction of our oceans and have an opportunity to protect them.

Each of the 21 species on Greenpeace’s Redlist is there because it meets a strict set of criteria that evaluate stock status, species vulnerability and the environmental impacts of fishing methods. There are different sets of criteria for farmed and wild species. 

Marine ecosystems have suffered a terrible toll from decades of industrial fishing. About three-quarters of global fish stocks are fished at capacity or overfished. Ninety per cent of large, predatory species have disappeared. In Canada, cod has all but vanished. To ensure oceans recover and fish are sustained, overfishing and other destructive practices must end. 

How Greenpeace works to ensure fish for the future

Challenging the marketplace: Our supermarket campaign takes direct action at Canadian grocery chains to convince them to stop selling Redlist fish and improve seafood labelling. To track progress, Greenpeace produces an annual ranking of Canada’s supermarkets.

  • Working with retailers: Greenpeace works with supermarkets to help them create more sustainable seafood procurement policies and push for more sustainable fisheries and better certification.
  • Informing consumers: We reach out to consumers through our actions, and invite them to educate themselves by reading our ranking and other materials.
  • Pressuring the government: We lobby federal politicians to demand responsible fisheries management and to create no-take areas in marine reserves. Greenpeace is part of a coalition that has sued the Canadian government for stronger regulations to protect our marine species at risk.

The latest updates

 

The "longline" of suffering and destruction

Blog entry by Sari Tolvanen | November 20, 2013

Tuna longline fisheries are one of the most scandalous fishing businesses on the planet, operating mostly out of sight and out of control. Longlining is the fishing method that catches the big valuable tunas aimed at fulfilling the...

Greenpeace’s Rainbow Warrior kicks off B.C. visit targeting salmon farms

Feature story | October 7, 2013 at 17:10

Greenpeace’s flagship the Rainbow Warrior arrived on Canada’s west coast this morning and joined members of the Tla-o-qui-aht First Nations, local environmental groups including Clayoquot Action and Friends of Clayoquot Sound, surfers, tourist...

Not here, not anywhere

Blog entry by Farah Obaidullah | September 5, 2013

It’s been a year since   Greenpeace in Australia took action against the Margiris super trawler and to mark the anniversary – admittedly coincidentally – Greenpeace activists in Chile protested against the presence of the monster boat...

Governments make slow progress on high seas protection but people’s wave of change is...

Blog entry by Sofia Tsenikli | August 29, 2013

The  UN meeting in New York  discussing high seas protection ended last Friday without a splash for the oceans, but the wave of change generated by thousands of people around the world made an inspiring impact. The meeting in...

GPC podcast: birds+plastic+ocean=gross, bees' needs,the big fish question

Blog entry by mambrose | August 28, 2013

The latest episode of the GPC podcast covers the birds and the bees. We look at what the buzz is around bees. Listen to the full podcast here These photos give you a clue. They are the prime pollinators for many of the...

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