Sustainable Seafood Markets

A pile of freshly caught fish on-board the 'Reiderland'. This German pair trawler is bottom trawling for North Sea Cod. © Greenpeace / Christian Aslund

Greenpeace targets supermarkets across the country in an effort to convince them to stop selling Redlist seafood—the most destructively fished or farmed species—and develop policies for greener seafood. As the middlemen between the oceans and the consumer, supermarkets play a pivotal role in the destruction of our oceans and have an opportunity to protect them.

Each of the 21 species on Greenpeace’s Redlist is there because it meets a strict set of criteria that evaluate stock status, species vulnerability and the environmental impacts of fishing methods. There are different sets of criteria for farmed and wild species. 

Marine ecosystems have suffered a terrible toll from decades of industrial fishing. About three-quarters of global fish stocks are fished at capacity or overfished. Ninety per cent of large, predatory species have disappeared. In Canada, cod has all but vanished. To ensure oceans recover and fish are sustained, overfishing and other destructive practices must end. 

How Greenpeace works to ensure fish for the future

Challenging the marketplace: Our supermarket campaign takes direct action at Canadian grocery chains to convince them to stop selling Redlist fish and improve seafood labelling. To track progress, Greenpeace produces an annual ranking of Canada’s supermarkets.

  • Working with retailers: Greenpeace works with supermarkets to help them create more sustainable seafood procurement policies and push for more sustainable fisheries and better certification.
  • Informing consumers: We reach out to consumers through our actions, and invite them to educate themselves by reading our ranking and other materials.
  • Pressuring the government: We lobby federal politicians to demand responsible fisheries management and to create no-take areas in marine reserves. Greenpeace is part of a coalition that has sued the Canadian government for stronger regulations to protect our marine species at risk.

The latest updates


Third baby orca spotted off Vancouver island!!!!

Blog entry by Sarah King | March 6, 2009 1 comment

With hopeful news from the feds last week that the critical habitat of the southern and resident orcas off B.C. is now, as of Wednesday, legally protected under the Species at Risk Act, the orcas have shown their gratitude with another...

Some good news for the BC orcas

Blog entry by Sarah King | February 20, 2009 3 comments

Things seem to be looking up a bit for the southern resident orcas as two new calves were seen on February 6 th off Vancouver Island. The good news comes after reports earlier this year that 7 orcas had gone missing including 2...

crashing cod

Blog entry by Sarah King | February 17, 2009

Slogging through my post-holiday emails I came across an article about the fate of an Atlantic cod stock off Newfoundland. It doesn’t look good. In fact, according to model predictions performed by biologists at DFO, it’s down right...

Fertilizing insanity

Blog entry by Sarah King | January 28, 2009

We fertilize our gardens to help our plants grow, but fertilizing the oceans to stop climate change? It sounds as ridiculous as it is. Dumping tonnes of iron sulphate into the ocean in hopes of stimulating massive up-take of carbon...

Greenpeace speaks up to protect the oceans at the Metro annual meeting

Feature story | January 28, 2009 at 17:00

Metro's annual general meeting had an unexpected guest this week when Greenpeace oceans coordinator, Beth Hunter, showed up to draw attention to their weak efforts on seafood sustainability.

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