Sustainable Seafood Markets

A pile of freshly caught fish on-board the 'Reiderland'. This German pair trawler is bottom trawling for North Sea Cod. © Greenpeace / Christian Aslund

Greenpeace targets supermarkets across the country in an effort to convince them to stop selling Redlist seafood—the most destructively fished or farmed species—and develop policies for greener seafood. As the middlemen between the oceans and the consumer, supermarkets play a pivotal role in the destruction of our oceans and have an opportunity to protect them.

Each of the 21 species on Greenpeace’s Redlist is there because it meets a strict set of criteria that evaluate stock status, species vulnerability and the environmental impacts of fishing methods. There are different sets of criteria for farmed and wild species. 

Marine ecosystems have suffered a terrible toll from decades of industrial fishing. About three-quarters of global fish stocks are fished at capacity or overfished. Ninety per cent of large, predatory species have disappeared. In Canada, cod has all but vanished. To ensure oceans recover and fish are sustained, overfishing and other destructive practices must end. 

How Greenpeace works to ensure fish for the future

Challenging the marketplace: Our supermarket campaign takes direct action at Canadian grocery chains to convince them to stop selling Redlist fish and improve seafood labelling. To track progress, Greenpeace produces an annual ranking of Canada’s supermarkets.

  • Working with retailers: Greenpeace works with supermarkets to help them create more sustainable seafood procurement policies and push for more sustainable fisheries and better certification.
  • Informing consumers: We reach out to consumers through our actions, and invite them to educate themselves by reading our ranking and other materials.
  • Pressuring the government: We lobby federal politicians to demand responsible fisheries management and to create no-take areas in marine reserves. Greenpeace is part of a coalition that has sued the Canadian government for stronger regulations to protect our marine species at risk.

The latest updates

 

First Canadian retailer stops selling farmed salmon!

Feature story | June 28, 2012 at 6:00

Three years after Greenpeace’s first ranking of Canada’s eight largest supermarket chains on seafood sustainability, Overwaitea Food Group has become the first chain to attain a “green” rating, in part due to its complete removal of open net-pen...

A big step forward for our oceans

Blog entry by Nathaniel Pelle | June 15, 2012

For a long time organisations like Greenpeace, backed by people like you, have been calling for stronger protection of our oceans. This week showed our voices were heard. The Australian Federal Environment Minister...

It’s time for fewer tuna fishing boats, not empty promises

Blog entry by Sari Tolvanen | June 13, 2012

There is consensus. Too many big tuna fishing boats are chasing declining tuna populations. Environmentalists know this; the tuna industry knows it and governments, scientists and fishermen know that if we want fish tomorrow, we...

World Oceans Day

Blog entry by Charles Latimer - Oceans Campaigner | June 8, 2012

Established during the first Rio conference in 1992, World Oceans Day is, 20 years later, an opportunity for us to look at the state of this important ecosystem. Oceans give life  Even though our oceans represent three...

Why an oceans rescue plan must be agreed at Rio

Blog entry by Richard Page, Greenpeace International | May 27, 2012

It’s only a few weeks until the Rio+20 Earth Summit and although the countdown has started, the world’s politicians still don’t understand that our long-term future is at stake. Our future depends on protecting the global...

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