Sustainable Seafood Markets

A pile of freshly caught fish on-board the 'Reiderland'. This German pair trawler is bottom trawling for North Sea Cod. © Greenpeace / Christian Aslund

Greenpeace targets supermarkets across the country in an effort to convince them to stop selling Redlist seafood—the most destructively fished or farmed species—and develop policies for greener seafood. As the middlemen between the oceans and the consumer, supermarkets play a pivotal role in the destruction of our oceans and have an opportunity to protect them.

Each of the 21 species on Greenpeace’s Redlist is there because it meets a strict set of criteria that evaluate stock status, species vulnerability and the environmental impacts of fishing methods. There are different sets of criteria for farmed and wild species. 

Marine ecosystems have suffered a terrible toll from decades of industrial fishing. About three-quarters of global fish stocks are fished at capacity or overfished. Ninety per cent of large, predatory species have disappeared. In Canada, cod has all but vanished. To ensure oceans recover and fish are sustained, overfishing and other destructive practices must end. 

How Greenpeace works to ensure fish for the future

Challenging the marketplace: Our supermarket campaign takes direct action at Canadian grocery chains to convince them to stop selling Redlist fish and improve seafood labelling. To track progress, Greenpeace produces an annual ranking of Canada’s supermarkets.

  • Working with retailers: Greenpeace works with supermarkets to help them create more sustainable seafood procurement policies and push for more sustainable fisheries and better certification.
  • Informing consumers: We reach out to consumers through our actions, and invite them to educate themselves by reading our ranking and other materials.
  • Pressuring the government: We lobby federal politicians to demand responsible fisheries management and to create no-take areas in marine reserves. Greenpeace is part of a coalition that has sued the Canadian government for stronger regulations to protect our marine species at risk.

The latest updates

 

World Oceans Day

Blog entry by Charles Latimer - Oceans Campaigner | June 8, 2012

Established during the first Rio conference in 1992, World Oceans Day is, 20 years later, an opportunity for us to look at the state of this important ecosystem. Oceans give life  Even though our oceans represent three...

Why an oceans rescue plan must be agreed at Rio

Blog entry by Richard Page, Greenpeace International | May 27, 2012

It’s only a few weeks until the Rio+20 Earth Summit and although the countdown has started, the world’s politicians still don’t understand that our long-term future is at stake. Our future depends on protecting the global...

New allies in the oceans revolution

Blog entry by Sari Tolvanen | May 22, 2012

Over the past few years we’ve seen increased consumer demand for sustainable tuna products. At the moment, the best option on the shelves is pole and line caught skipjack tuna , the population of which is still relatively plentiful...

Protecting Antarctica, the heart of the ocean

Blog entry by Veronica Frank | May 22, 2012

For many people the Antarctic is little more than a far-away frozen region, literally at the edge of the world; with sterile glaciers, icebergs and colonies of not-so ‘Happy Feet’ penguins, buffeted for much of their lives in the...

Update from Senegal: victory for our oceans!

Blog entry by Raoul Monsembula, Greenpeace Africa | May 14, 2012

Last week, the Senegalese government cancelled all fishing permits for foreign“ pelagic trawlers ,” large fishing vessels that drag nets below the surface of the ocean. This should remind leaders that with political will and...

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