Sustainable Seafood Markets

A pile of freshly caught fish on-board the 'Reiderland'. This German pair trawler is bottom trawling for North Sea Cod. © Greenpeace / Christian Aslund

Greenpeace targets supermarkets across the country in an effort to convince them to stop selling Redlist seafood—the most destructively fished or farmed species—and develop policies for greener seafood. As the middlemen between the oceans and the consumer, supermarkets play a pivotal role in the destruction of our oceans and have an opportunity to protect them.

Each of the 21 species on Greenpeace’s Redlist is there because it meets a strict set of criteria that evaluate stock status, species vulnerability and the environmental impacts of fishing methods. There are different sets of criteria for farmed and wild species. 

Marine ecosystems have suffered a terrible toll from decades of industrial fishing. About three-quarters of global fish stocks are fished at capacity or overfished. Ninety per cent of large, predatory species have disappeared. In Canada, cod has all but vanished. To ensure oceans recover and fish are sustained, overfishing and other destructive practices must end. 

How Greenpeace works to ensure fish for the future

Challenging the marketplace: Our supermarket campaign takes direct action at Canadian grocery chains to convince them to stop selling Redlist fish and improve seafood labelling. To track progress, Greenpeace produces an annual ranking of Canada’s supermarkets.

  • Working with retailers: Greenpeace works with supermarkets to help them create more sustainable seafood procurement policies and push for more sustainable fisheries and better certification.
  • Informing consumers: We reach out to consumers through our actions, and invite them to educate themselves by reading our ranking and other materials.
  • Pressuring the government: We lobby federal politicians to demand responsible fisheries management and to create no-take areas in marine reserves. Greenpeace is part of a coalition that has sued the Canadian government for stronger regulations to protect our marine species at risk.

The latest updates

 

Our leaders can and should save the Pacific tuna next week

Blog entry by Duncan Williams, Greenpeace Australia | March 19, 2012

Ocean stewardship in the Pacific has come a long way. Ask a Pacific islander fifty years ago about managing fish and you would have been greeted with a look of bemusement. After all, fish back in the day were thought of as...

Back in court battling for a better world for the orcas

Blog entry by Sarah King | November 30, 2011

We’re back in court this morning along with eight other environmental groups and our awesome lawyers at Ecojustice to continue our fight for the protection of British Columbia’s killer whales. Contrary to what the Department of...

Greenpeace Releases Shocking Video of Tuna Industry’s Wasteful Fishing Practices

Feature story | November 17, 2011 at 10:00

17 November 2011 (Vancouver) – Shocking video footage captured by a tuna industry whistleblower was released by Greenpeace today. The video reveals the routine and careless slaughter of marine species, including whale sharks, rays and whales [1].

Greenpeace returns ocean destruction to Canadian tuna giant Clover Leaf

Feature story | October 26, 2011 at 10:00

Greenpeace activists visited Clover Leaf Seafoods’ Canadian headquarters this morning to return cases of the company’s canned tuna products and deliver a platter of simulated marine life remains, representing the wasteful fisheries the company...

Canadian Supermarkets Driving Change on Seafood Sustainability: Greenpeace

Feature story | July 7, 2011 at 8:30

(Vancouver) — A new Greenpeace ranking report shows all eight of Canada’s major supermarket chains are making progress on implementing sustainability policies that will help reduce the burden on some of the most commercially popular – but...

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