Sustainable Seafood Markets

A pile of freshly caught fish on-board the 'Reiderland'. This German pair trawler is bottom trawling for North Sea Cod. © Greenpeace / Christian Aslund

Greenpeace targets supermarkets across the country in an effort to convince them to stop selling Redlist seafood—the most destructively fished or farmed species—and develop policies for greener seafood. As the middlemen between the oceans and the consumer, supermarkets play a pivotal role in the destruction of our oceans and have an opportunity to protect them.

Each of the 21 species on Greenpeace’s Redlist is there because it meets a strict set of criteria that evaluate stock status, species vulnerability and the environmental impacts of fishing methods. There are different sets of criteria for farmed and wild species. 

Marine ecosystems have suffered a terrible toll from decades of industrial fishing. About three-quarters of global fish stocks are fished at capacity or overfished. Ninety per cent of large, predatory species have disappeared. In Canada, cod has all but vanished. To ensure oceans recover and fish are sustained, overfishing and other destructive practices must end. 

How Greenpeace works to ensure fish for the future

Challenging the marketplace: Our supermarket campaign takes direct action at Canadian grocery chains to convince them to stop selling Redlist fish and improve seafood labelling. To track progress, Greenpeace produces an annual ranking of Canada’s supermarkets.

  • Working with retailers: Greenpeace works with supermarkets to help them create more sustainable seafood procurement policies and push for more sustainable fisheries and better certification.
  • Informing consumers: We reach out to consumers through our actions, and invite them to educate themselves by reading our ranking and other materials.
  • Pressuring the government: We lobby federal politicians to demand responsible fisheries management and to create no-take areas in marine reserves. Greenpeace is part of a coalition that has sued the Canadian government for stronger regulations to protect our marine species at risk.

The latest updates


Saving the last Japanese dugongs

Blog entry by Karli Thomas, Oceans Campaigner at Greenpeace NZ | November 6, 2015

The home of the last few Japanese dugongs is about to be landfilled to make way for two airstrips - part of the expansion of a US military base on the island of Okinawa. But a movement nearly 18 years old is standing up to say NO.

5 Ways Seismic Blasting Threatens Whales

Blog entry by Farrah Khan, Arctic Campaigner | August 27, 2015 1 comment

We don’t have to look very far back in history to find proof of why offshore oil drilling is a dangerous endeavour. The BP oil blowout and  the Exxon-Valdez spill both left surrounding regions devastated and neither company was able to...

We won! United Nations decide to develop a High Seas Biodiversity Agreement

Blog entry by Sofia Tsenikli | June 22, 2015 1 comment

Only a few days ago - June 19th  -  the United Nations General Assembly formally decided to develop a High Seas Biodiversity Agreement, endorsing the breakthrough outcome of the UN biodiversity working group meeting in January. ...

Podcast:Apps for Activism and Fish Factory Trawlers

Blog entry by Mary Ambrose | March 2, 2015

Recently I read a story which I found truly shocking. It was about the sinking of a Korean fish factory trawler into the frigid depths of the Bering Sea off of Russia’s east coast. This particular fish factory trawler was on ...

Major breakthrough for Ocean Lovers: UN takes landmark step towards high seas...

Blog entry by Sofia Tsenikli | January 27, 2015

It is time for Ocean Lovers worldwide to celebrate! After years of political foot-dragging, and four hectic days of   negotiations   at the United Nations, a   breakthrough   came in the wee hours of Saturday morning, 24 January:...

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