Shadowlands: From Chernobyl to Fukushima

Feature story - February 23, 2012
Greenpeace believes that nuclear reactors are a dangerous power source that will always be vulnerable to the deadly combination of human errors, design failures and natural disasters.

“Walking through those villages, there is this tremendous sense of loss: the loss of culture and tradition, the loss of community and way of life, and the loss of health and even life itself.”

-      Photographer Robert Knoth on the desolate villages surrounding the Chernobyl and Fukushima reactors.

Shadowlands: From Chernobyl to Fukushima is a haunting photo exhibit on the loss suffered as a result of the Chernobyl and Fukushima nuclear disasters. The exhibit's 26 images juxtapose the human and environmental impacts of both disasters by presenting them in pairs.


Opening Night:
March 7 – 7 p.m. to 10 p.m.

Exhibition Dates:
March 7-10 and March 14-18

Gallery hours:
Wed – Sat 1 p.m. – 5 p.m.
Thurs 1 p.m. – 8 p.m.

Workshops and panel discussions:
March 18 – 1 p.m. to 5 p.m.

 Each set of photos contains stylistic or compositional similarities that link the two disasters. The visual parallels evoke a connection between these events and the possibility of a similar disaster occurring in Canada.
 
The photos featured in the exhibit were taken by photographer Robert Knoth and journalist Antoinette de Jong during their visits to the surrounding areas of Chernobyl between 1999 and 2005 and the Fukushima region in the fall of 2011.
 
Both Knoth and de Jong are internationally renowned for their ability to beautifully capture gritty subjects. Their award-winning work has been showcased all over the world and published in The New York Times and National Geographic.
 
Greenpeace’s campaign
 
Greenpeace believes that nuclear reactors are a dangerous power source that will always be vulnerable to the deadly combination of human errors, design failures and natural disasters.
 
Since March 2011, Greenpeace has monitored radiation levels around Fukushima. Highly qualified radiation specialists conducted independent investigations, testing the environment, food and seafood in the region, to ensure the public remains informed about the disaster and associated risks.
 
Here in Canada, Greenpeace is focusing its efforts to stop the refurbishments of the Darlington reactor in Ontario and the Gentilly-2 reactor in Quebec. In addition, Greenpeace Canada is working to stop two new reactors from being built in Ontario. These projects will only expose more Canadians to the hazardous nuclear industry and increase the likelihood of the next nuclear disaster occurring in Canada.
 
Support a green energy future and tell the Ontario government to shut down Darlington.
 
Sign the Darlington Declaration here: http://stopdarlington.org/declaration.

 

For more information about the 918 Bathurst Centre for Culture, Arts, Media and Education, please visit their website: http://918bathurst.com/

Vote for your favourite pair of photos below.

 

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