Greenpeace occupies AbitibiBowater headquarters

Feature story - September 23, 2008
This morning, Greenpeace occupied the Montréal headquarters of logging company AbitibiBowater. In the early morning hours, three activists entered the offices of Canada’s largest logging company AbitibiBowater. They chained themselves to the entranceway doors and are currently disrupting day-to-day operations of the newsprint multinational. They are protesting AbitibiBowater’s ongoing destruction of the Boreal Forest.

Greenpeace activists occupied the Montréal headquarters of logging company AbitibiBowater. The activists chained themselves to the entranceway doors and are currently disrupting day-to-day operations of the newsprint multinational. They are protesting AbitibiBowater’s ongoing destruction of the Boreal Forest.

Once again this year, AbitibiBowater continues to log in the last intactstands of the Boreal Forest, and it has no plans to change itspractices. From Greenpeace's standpoint, AbitibiBowater is simplyrefusing to protect the Boreal Forest.

While activists are disrupting day-to-day activities at AbitibiBowater headquarters, other volunteers are demonstrating peacefully outside the company's building, handing out newspapers bearing the headline "AbitibiBowater refuses to protect the Boreal Forest."

 

TAKE ACTION Help protect the Boreal Forest!

Send a loud and clear message to David Paterson, CEO of AbitibiBowater, and his Vice President of Sustainability, Denis Leclerc,.

Tell David Paterson that as head of the company controlling the largest areas of public forest land in Québec and Ontario, it is his duty to preserve the remaining intact stands.

Protecting intact forests preserves ecosystems vital to maintaining biodiversity, saves threatened species such as woodland caribou and helps stabilize the world's climate.

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Take Action Now!

Abitibibowater refuses to protect the Boreal Forest

We are engaging in peaceful civil disobedience today to protest AbitibiBowater's destruction of the Boreal Forest and its awful record as responsible corporate citizen.

The company controls the largest tracts of publically owned forest in Québec and Ontario, a total of 24 million hectares.

As it logs these vast areas, AbitibiBowater does very little to preserve intact areas. In fact, less than 3 percent of the land under AbitibiBowater's management is protected from logging in Québec, and less than 6 percent in Ontario. These numbers are confirmed by data from the independent satellite mapping organization Global Forest Watch Canada.

Green Wash? No thanks!

For AbitibiBowater to become a leader in sustainable development it will require extensive action over millions of hectares of threatened forest. In Greenpeace's view, AbitibiBowater cannot improve its sustainability record simply through minor changes or isolated environmental measures.

AbitibiBowater have refused to defer logging in intact forests and in the habitat of woodland caribou. Paterson's company refuses to work to protect these areas permanently.

Protecting intact forests preserves ecosystems vital to maintaining biodiversity, saves threatened species and helps stabilize the world's climate. It is for this very reason that Greenpeace continues to denounce the forestry practices of AbitibiBowater and its mediocre record on sustainability.

Greenpeace is also enlisting the support of citizens, along with customers and shareholders of the company, in Québec and around the world, to force AbitibiBowater to become a more responsible corporate citizen.

Greenpeace has been pressuring the Québec logging company since the publication of the report Consuming Canada's Boreal Forest in August 2007. Before checking out the timeline of Greenpeace's activities targeting the newsprint multinational, take action and send a message to AbitibiBowater president, David J. Paterson.

 

Greenpeace's Demands of Abitibibowater

  • Suspend all logging in intact forest areas.
  • Identify zones of ecological importance, including woodland caribou habitat, and work with governments and NGOs to create a network of protected areas that include these zones.
  • Certify all operations including mills and product line to the Forest Stewardship Council (FSC) standard - a mark of responsible forestry.
  • Commit to not pursuing new licenses in previously unallocated areas of the forest.
  • Inform, involve and gain the consent of First Nations peoples before logging on their traditional lands.


 

 

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