Reduce Air Pollution

Air pollution is a severe problem – one that we ignore at the risk of our health and our economy. Smog hangs heavy over Beijing, Shanghai and Hong Kong, where children grow up with asthma and other respiratory illnesses.

Of particular concern is PM2.5 (particles with an aerodynamic diameter less than 2.5 μm) air pollution. In Beijing, Shanghai, Guangzhou and Xi’an, PM2.5 concentration levels in all four cities exceed World Heath Organisation (WHO) air quality guidelines. This means higher health risks to the cardiovascular system, cerebrovascular system and an increase in the probability of cancer and premature death.

And supposing if the four cities effectively controlled PM2.5 levels and had met WHO air quality guidelines in 2012, the number of premature deaths would have decreased by at least 81%, while the economic benefits of reducing these premature deaths in the four cities would amount to 875 million USD.

China's economy has skyrocketed, but at a price. Power plants, factories and heavy industries are all belching out black, dirty air, at the cost of our health and our environment.

Greenpeace is one of the leading NGOs working on campaigns to reduce sources of air pollution in China.

Read more on air pollution in China:

The latest updates

 

How China's coal control measures could help avoid catastrophic climate change in...

Blog entry by Li Shuo | 2014-04-10

China’s coal control measures, driven by severe air pollution across the country, could help the world avoid catastrophic climate change, according to a new analysis . The UN IPCC’s third working group, meeting in Berlin this week,...

Want to reduce China's smog? The answer lies in controlling coal use

Blog entry by Greenpeace East Asia | 2014-03-15

More than 10 percent of China's land area has been shrouded in thick smog in recent days, with the level of PM2.5 (particulate matter with a diameter of 2.5 micrometers or less and very harmful to humans) frequently exceeding danger...

The growth of China's coal demand is drying up

Blog entry by Greenpeace East Asia | 2014-03-07

With new policies on air pollution and the economy, China’s coal consumption has been projected to cool down for a while, and the first evidence of the trend is starting to show up in statistics. Recent ambitious policy announcements...

Bad to worse: ranking 74 Chinese cities by air pollution

Blog entry by Monica Tan | 2014-02-19

We've mined the data and produced a ranking of 74 Chinese cities by levels of PM2.5 air pollution . The figures were taken from official data published by the Ministry of Environmental Protection for the year of 2013, but we've...

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