Reduce Air Pollution

Air pollution is a severe problem – one that we ignore at the risk of our health and our economy. Smog hangs heavy over Beijing, Shanghai and Hong Kong, where children grow up with asthma and other respiratory illnesses.

Of particular concern is PM2.5 (particles with an aerodynamic diameter less than 2.5 μm) air pollution. In Beijing, Shanghai, Guangzhou and Xi’an, PM2.5 concentration levels in all four cities exceed World Heath Organisation (WHO) air quality guidelines. This means higher health risks to the cardiovascular system, cerebrovascular system and an increase in the probability of cancer and premature death.

And supposing if the four cities effectively controlled PM2.5 levels and had met WHO air quality guidelines in 2012, the number of premature deaths would have decreased by at least 81%, while the economic benefits of reducing these premature deaths in the four cities would amount to 875 million USD.

China's economy has skyrocketed, but at a price. Power plants, factories and heavy industries are all belching out black, dirty air, at the cost of our health and our environment.

Greenpeace is one of the leading NGOs working on campaigns to reduce sources of air pollution in China.

Read more on air pollution in China:

The latest updates

 

Tracing back the smog

Publication | 2013-12-02 at 15:30

Greenpeace has been co-operating with a team from the University of Leeds, UK, led by Dr. Dabo Guan, with the aim to study PM2.5 sources and control strategies in Jingjinji, since the end of 2012. This project report is the first of its kind to...

Making a run for it: Zhong Yu's journey from North to South

Blog entry by Greenpeace East Asia | 2013-11-27

“I run to be healthy, but I never know whether I’m actually getting healthier by running or whether I’m just breathing in more harmful particles”, Zhong Yu. Last Saturday was the second ever Guangzhou Marathon. The theme of this...

How do we translate China's policy shift on air pollution into progressive climate...

Blog entry by Li Shuo | 2013-11-19

Air pollution presents an opportunity to revisit China’s high emission growth path. During the Warsaw Climate Change Conference, delegates need to prepare ground for further action from China. Over the last year, air pollution has...

The government of China, like Poland, has a different view of what the people they...

Blog entry by Li Shuo | 2013-11-14

Coming from Beijing to attend the Warsaw climate summit, I expected to have temporary relief for my lungs. As I departed from Beijing’s international airport, the city’s air quality index (AQI) shot up 15 times higher than the World...

What needs to happen next on air pollution

Blog entry by Li Shuo | 2013-10-22 1 comment

“Golden Week” was anything but golden for Beijingers as the city was once again blanketed by heavy haze. The air quality index climbed above 400 during the October national holiday period, a level more than 10 times higher than the...

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