Reduce Air Pollution

Air pollution is a severe problem – one that we ignore at the risk of our health and our economy. Smog hangs heavy over Beijing, Shanghai and Hong Kong, where children grow up with asthma and other respiratory illnesses.

Of particular concern is PM2.5 (particles with an aerodynamic diameter less than 2.5 μm) air pollution. In Beijing, Shanghai, Guangzhou and Xi’an, PM2.5 concentration levels in all four cities exceed World Heath Organisation (WHO) air quality guidelines. This means higher health risks to the cardiovascular system, cerebrovascular system and an increase in the probability of cancer and premature death.

And supposing if the four cities effectively controlled PM2.5 levels and had met WHO air quality guidelines in 2012, the number of premature deaths would have decreased by at least 81%, while the economic benefits of reducing these premature deaths in the four cities would amount to 875 million USD.

China's economy has skyrocketed, but at a price. Power plants, factories and heavy industries are all belching out black, dirty air, at the cost of our health and our environment.

Greenpeace is one of the leading NGOs working on campaigns to reduce sources of air pollution in China.

Read more on air pollution in China:

The latest updates

 

It's time the MEP walked its talk

Blog entry by Li Shuo | 2013-05-21

For residents in Beijing and many other eastern parts of China, this spring means another choking season of air pollution and a few more months of waiting for real cleanup action. Earlier in March, at a press conference of the...

Hazardous air: What goes into your lungs on a bad day in Beijing

Blog entry by Lauri Myllyvirta | 2013-05-07

Image: One of the 16 volunteers with the sampler simulating human breathing.  © Greenpeace This was originally posted on Greenpeace International on April 23, 2013. You have seen air pollution before, but not in...

Exposing the Heavy Metal Concentration of PM2.5 in Beijing

Publication | 2013-04-24 at 2:00

From December 3, 2012 to January 18, 2013, Beijing experienced the most severe episode of air pollution since PM2.5 monitoring data became available. In this period, Greenpeace carried out monitoring of individual PM2.5 exposure to nine...

Beijing won't meet WHO air pollution standards until 2030s

Blog entry by Li Shuo and Lauri Myllyvirta | 2013-04-11

Beijing has finally decided to do something about its air pollution. Last week, the city announced a multibillion yuan campaign to tackle its environmental problems, an urgent follow up to last month's parliamentary sessions, where...

Solutions to put an end to China's air pollution crisis

Blog entry by Monica Tan | 2013-03-14

We all know China has a severe air pollution problem, particularly in big cities such as Beijing. But what can - or dare we say, must - be done about it? The most basic solution for air pollution is to end its root causes: quit coal...

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