Reduce Air Pollution

Air pollution is a severe problem – one that has serious impacts on our health and our economy. According to a recent World Health Organization study, nine out of ten of people worldwide breath polluted air. Toxic air pollution particles lodge themselves deep in our lungs and enter our bloodstreams – with serious health effects.

Of particular concern is PM2.5 (particles with an aerodynamic diameter less than 2.5 μm) air pollution. In 2017, average PM2.5 concentrations in Beijing exceeded World Health Organisation (WHO) air quality guidelines by nearly sixfold, and by almost fourfold in Shanghai. In the 338 cities for which monitoring data is available, average PM2.5 concentrations amounted to 4.3 times the WHO guideline. This means higher health risks to the cardiovascular system, cerebrovascular system and an increase in the probability of cancer and premature death.

Ozone (03) is also a major concern in China. Levels of this invisible particule, which causes lung damage, symptoms in asthma patients, and respiratory and cardiovascular diseases, are on the rise. Average ozone exposure in China rose 17% between 2014 and 2017, an increase which caused an estimated 12,000 premature deaths per year.

The good news is that China’s massive shift from coal power to renewable energy is already underway – and is key to ensuring further air quality improvements.

Greenpeace is one of the leading NGOs working on campaigns to reduce sources of air pollution in China.

Read more on air pollution in China:

 

The latest updates

 

China's coal to gas plans: old wine in new bottles

Blog entry by Justin Guay and Li Shuo | 2014-01-19

The Chinese coal industry has a plan to solve the nations air pollution crisis -- consume more coal. Last week the Chinese chief energy planning agency, the National Energy Administration (NEA) concluded its annual work session with a...

5 things Beijing needs to do to bring back blue skies

Blog entry by Greenpeace East Asia | 2013-12-10

The following is an excerpt from our report: Tracking back the smog . In China, as clear and concrete pollution reduction goals at the central and local government levels are being set, public concern for a deteriorating living...

Study points to coal burning as origin of northern China airpocalypse

Press release | 2013-12-02 at 12:30

Beijing - Coal burning is the biggest contributor of air pollution in Beijing and surrounding area, according to a University of Leeds study sponsored by Greenpeace East Asia. Previous studies have linked outdoor air pollution to premature deaths...

Tracing back the smog

Publication | 2013-12-02 at 12:30

Greenpeace has been co-operating with a team from the University of Leeds, UK, led by Dr. Dabo Guan, with the aim to study PM2.5 sources and control strategies in Jingjinji, since the end of 2012. This project report is the first of its kind to...

Making a run for it: Zhong Yu's journey from North to South

Blog entry by Greenpeace East Asia | 2013-11-26

“I run to be healthy, but I never know whether I’m actually getting healthier by running or whether I’m just breathing in more harmful particles”, Zhong Yu. Last Saturday was the second ever Guangzhou Marathon. The theme of this...

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