End Illegal Logging: A Responsible Purchasing Policy

A Responsible Purchasing Policy

Standard Page - 2011-06-21
Greenpeace is campaigning for the Chinese government, industry and consumers to stop the importing and trade of timber and wood products that causes the destruction of forests. Through policy and law, corporate responsibility, and consumer awareness, China’s development need not come at the cost of our forests, whether within China or abroad.

Greenpeace is campaigning for the Chinese government, industry and consumers to stop the importing and trade of timber and wood products that causes the destruction of forests. Through policy and law, corporate responsibility, and consumer awareness, China’s development need not come at the cost of our forests, whether within China or abroad.

Stolen Wood in Your Home?

In April 2007, Greenpeace published a report exposing the connection between China’s construction and home furnishings industry and the global crisis in illegal logging. Many home improvement companies were selling products made from tropical hardwood species, including merbau from New Guinea, teak from Burma, jatoba from the Amazon and sapelli from Africa. Illegal logging is highly common in most of these places, and merbau is highly endangered.

The report called for home-furnishing retailers to take up their responsibility as the most visible link between producers and consumers to actively promote sustainably sourced timber and stop the sale of illegally forest products.

Many retailers responded positively to our report. In June 2007, worldwide home furnishings retailer B&Q committed to ensuring that all of its timber products in its 60 stores across China come from legal sources. The British company also committed to a three-year plan to guarantee that its wood and paper products come from certified responsible forests or recycled materials. In January 2011, B&Q became the first home furnishings company to sell FSC-certified flooring in China.

Other home improvement and furnishings companies, such as Home Depot, Orient Home and Leroy Merlin, have also promised to stop purchasing and selling illegally logged merbau.

Greenpeace’s Good Wood Guide helps consumers make responsible decisions when it comes time to renovate and decorate their homes.

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