Eliminate Toxic Chemicals

Toxic chemical pollution is a real and deadly danger for many people in China. Hundreds of millions of people here lack access to clean drinking water, while many more are drinking contaminated water.

Over the last three decades, China's economic development has transformed the country, replacing fields and forests with thousands of factories.

Though the factories may bring wealth, they also severely pollute China's precious water resources. The widespread dumping of toxic chemicals and industrial wastewater has poisoned rivers and groundwater – and the people who rely on them.

But together we're challenging some of the world's most popular clothing brands to work with their suppliers and eliminate all releases of hazardous chemicals into our water. Learn more about our internationally acclaimed Detox campaign.

The latest updates

 

How Lenovo scored in our Greener Electronics Guide

Feature Story | 2011-11-08 at 20:59

Do you own any Lenovo products, or planning to buy any? The company recently landed themselves on Greenpeace's 'Greener Electronics Guide'. Greenpeace's Guide ranks electronics companies on their environmental performance in three areas: use of...

How Samsung scored in our Greener Electronics Guide

Feature Story | 2011-11-08 at 19:47

Do you own any Samsung products, or planning to buy any? The company recently landed themselves on Greenpeace's 'Greener Electronics Guide'. Greenpeace's Guide ranks electronics companies on their environmental performance in three areas: use of...

Buying gadgets in China? Make them green!

Feature Story | 2011-11-08 at 19:15

Shoppers are increasingly concerned about the impact of what they buy, and they're getting better at spotting corporate greenwash and spin too. After many of the world's leading electronics companies rose to the challenge of phasing out the worst...

Chromium waste dumpers in Yunnan taken to court

Feature Story | 2011-11-02 at 19:28

Two months after illegally dumping toxic chromium waste in eastern Yunnan province, likely causing cancer in local residents and attracting national media attention, Luliang Chemical Co. is still under the microscope. By Evan Brooks.

H&M to disclose hazardous chemical discharge reports, factory by factory

Blog entry by Monica Tan | 2011-10-27

Swedish "fast fashion" brand H&M have recently made public their " restricted substance list ", the first step in a process to make more transparent their production processes, including use of hazardous chemicals. This follows our...

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