Toxics Feature Stories

The latest updates


What does a 140,000 ton pile of dumped chromium waste look like?

Blog entry by Monica Tan | 2011-08-31

Unluckily, just like a very large pile of dirt. Their unassuming appearance means dumped piles of chemical waste can go months unnoticed and unchecked in the countryside of China. But this "dirt" is toxic, possibly cancer-causing, and...

Greenpeace says China's Li Ning detox offer not over finish line yet

Press release | 2011-08-25 at 13:05

Beijing – Greenpeace said today an offer by Li Ning, one of China's leading sports clothing companies, to reduce its use of toxic chemicals is insufficient following commitments by some of the world's leading clothing brands to detox their...

Hong Kong: Bringing banners into boardrooms

Blog entry by Monica Tan | 2011-08-24 2 comments

When it comes to being guilty of using toxic chemicals, sports brand Li Ning isn't alone. A recent Greenpeace report has revealed that at least 14 global brands sell clothes containing the hormone-distrupting toxic chemical...

Adidas needs to earn its stripes by championing a toxic-free future

Feature Story | 2011-08-23 at 18:30

Our latest research reveals that there is a good chance that the clothes you are wearing may contain nonylphenol ethoxylates (NPEs), chemicals which can break down in water to form nonylphenol (NP) -- a toxic, persistent and hormone-disrupting...

Greenpeace testing of leading brand clothes shows most contain hormone-disrupting...

Press release | 2011-08-23 at 15:00

Beijing – A new investigation by Greenpeace has found residues of hormone-disrupting chemicals in the products of 14 leading brands including Adidas, Li Ning, H&M and Abercrombie & Fitch. The presence of nonylphenol ethoxylates (NPEs) in clothes...

Sticker attack: Rebranding Adidas Hong Kong and globally

Feature Story | 2011-08-22 at 14:11

Nike has joined first-mover Puma, but Adidas is still stuck in the starting blocks. Hong Kong activists hit the Adidas and Li Ning stores in Tsim Sha Tsui and Causeway Bay with Detox stickers in hand.

Nike leaps ahead of Adidas and Li Ning in commitment to end toxic discharge

Press release | 2011-08-19 at 12:49

Beijing – The world's largest sportswear brand, Nike, has today committed to eliminate all hazardous chemicals across its entire supply chain by 2020 following a Greenpeace challenge to 'Detox'.

Nike commits to champion a toxic-free future

Feature Story | 2011-08-18 at 17:02 3 comments

The world's #1 sportswear brand, Nike, has accepted our Detox challenge: today it has officially committed to eliminating all hazardous chemicals across its entire supply chain, and the entire life-cycle of its products by 2020. This is a major...

Puma makes historic commitment to eliminate hazardous chemicals from its global...

Press release | 2011-07-27 at 1:11

Puma, the third largest sportswear company in the world, became the first company to publicly commit to eliminate all releases of hazardous chemicals from its entire product lifecycle and across its global supply chain by 2020 (1). The move comes...

The Story of One Sock

Blog entry by Zhang, East Asia Toxics Campaigner | 2011-07-14

It is said that happiness is actually very simple - a cat eating fish, a dog eating meat, Ultraman fighting a monster. But at the same time, unhappiness is also very easy: for example, a clean-freak Virgo squatting beside a wastewater...

91 - 100 of 190 results.