Greenpeace climbers captivate power plant urging government to regulate its CO2 emissions

Press release - 2007-12-06
Four Greenpeace climbers captivated today the largest local perpetrator of climate change, CLP Castle Peak Power Plant, while the UN Climate Conference in Bali is thrashing out solutions to global warming. Greenpeace is dissatisfied with the government shirking its responsibility to restrain greenhouse gas emissions from power plants. The climbers scaled the fly ash silos and dropped a massive banner saying 'Climate Change Starts Here', urging the government to limit carbon dioxide emissions from power plants as a move to tackle climate change.

Four Greenpeace climbers captivated today the largest local perpetrator of climate change, CLP Castle Peak Power Plant, while the UN Climate Conference in Bali is thrashing out solutions to global warming. Two Greenpeace vessels gear towards the Castle Peak Power Plant, allowing the climbers to scale to a 30M-tall ash silos and suspend a 15m x 15m banner reading “Climate Change Starts Here”.

Two Greenpeace vessels gear towards the Castle Peak Power Plant, allowing the climbers to scale to two 30M-tall ash silos and suspend a 15m x 15m banner reading "Climate Change Starts Here".

Frances Yeung, Greenpeace Climate and Energy Campaigner, says the action alerts the public to indifference of the government to damages the power plants have done to the climate.

"We cannot afford to wait as crisis of global warming is escalating. Solutions to global warming are readily available. While other countries and metropolitans have already taken actions, Hong Kong government has made no immediate response to reduce greenhouse gas emissions from the power plants. Donald Tsang's boast of his concern to global warming is far from the truth," says she.

Power plants are the biggest local source of greenhouse gas emissions, which account for about 70% of carbon dioxide emissions (the major warming gases) in Hong Kong. Among them CLP is the biggest polluter, responsible for half of the release.

At present, the Government only regulates emissions of sulphur dioxide, nitrogen dioxide and respirable suspended particulates, excluding carbon dioxide. Greenhouse gas emissions in Hong Kong have been increasing rapidly over the decade. Between 1990 and 2005, the emissions have increased 14%.

The government is negotiating the new Scheme of Control Agreement (SOC) with the two local power companies which will last for 10 years. Greenpeace believes that global warming is too serious for the government to allow power plants continue to damage the climate. The government must limit carbon dioxide emissions from power plants and their profits must be deducted if they exceed the emission caps.

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