Hong Kong as a Free Port of Hazardous E-waste

Press release - 2005-05-25
Greenpeace presented 6 chicken coops of electronic waste (e-waste) to the Environment, Transport and Works Bureau, implying the uncontrolled flow of e-waste in Hong Kong.

Greenpeace activists portrayed as chicken hawkers, holding the chicken coops of e-waste, including abandoned circuit boards, wires, keyboards, mouses, outside the legislative council building.

Regarding the e-waste trade regulations, the legislative council (Legco) passed the motion questioned by legislative councilor, Mr. Kwong Chi-kin.  Greenpeace welcomes  Legco's approval of the motion without against votes. This motion demands the SAR government to revise the relevant law, and to strengthen the law enforcement in preventing e-waste from polluting Hong Kong and other places. The motion reflects the disappointment of Legco and the general public in lacking the control of e-waste. Greenpeace calls for the Environmental Protection Department (EPD) to follow the opinion of majority, and stop the e-waste trade.

Greenpeace activists portrayed as chicken hawkers, holding the chicken coops of e-waste, including abandoned circuit boards, wires, keyboards, mouses, outside the legislative council building.

Legislative councillors Mr. Kwong Chi-kin, Audrey Eu and Ms. Choy So-yuk joined the protest. They labelled the chicken coops with a stop e-waste trade symbol. Greenpeace volunteers then presented the chicken cages, together with the e-waste, and a letter, to a representative of the Environmental Protection Department.

Legal loophole exists in e-waste trade regulations for long in Hong Kong. However, the HKSAR government have not review the law, transferring Hong Kong as a free port of hazardous e-waste in the Asia region.

Greenpeace urges the HKSAR government for tightening the legislation to stop transferring Hong Kong as a free port for e-waste trade as well as dumping e-waste into the landfills.  In the long run, Extended Producer Responsibility (EPR) should be exercised to ensure the electronic manufacturers to take full responsibility for their own products, materialise the toxic-free production and establish a comprehensive and effective recycling system.  This is the ultimate way to solve the problem.

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