Exposing the Heavy Metal Concentration of PM2.5 in Beijing

Add a comment
Publication - 2013-04-24
From December 3, 2012 to January 18, 2013, Beijing experienced the most severe episode of air pollution since PM2.5 monitoring data became available. In this period, Greenpeace carried out monitoring of individual PM2.5 exposure to nine volunteers in the Beijing area using individual samplers (with a duration of 22 days and 42 samples), and also entrusted the Public Health Faculty of Peking University to monitor PM2.5 in the air (for 15 days) on the 6th floor platform of their building.

Clean air is a basic health requirement for every human being. However, air pollution across the globe is constantly threatening human health.

On December 18, 2012, Greenpeace and the Public Health Faculty of Peking University jointly issued the report Dangerous Breathing, PM2.5: Measuring the Human Health and Economic Impacts on China's Largest Cities, which found that PM2.5 (particles with an aerodynamic diameter less than 2.5μm) pollution has caused extensive damage to public health. Under existing air quality conditions, the total number of premature deaths in the four cities of Beijing, Shanghai, Guangzhou and Xi’an in 2012 would be 8,572, and the economic loss caused by these deaths would reach 6.8 billion RMB.

PM2.5 is prone to absorb hazardous substances, and is a major issue currently endangering Chinese public health. PM2.5 from different sources has different compositions and various impacts on health. In China, the concentration monitoring of PM2.5 has just begun, and discussions of PM2.5 sources and how to control it is also at a primary stage. This research focuses on heavy metal contamination of PM2.5 and the relevant individual exposure risks.

Toxicology experiments have proven that metal elements are possible components of health hazards in air particles. Compared to PM10, PM2.5 is more capable of carrying heavy metals, and is therefore more hazardous to human health.3 Based on this observation, we hope more consideration will be given to the hazardous substance constituents carried by PM2.5 and how it should be dealt with when we talk about PM2.5 control.

From December 3, 2012 to January 18, 2013, Beijing experienced the most severe episode of air pollution since PM2.5 monitoring data became available. In this period, Greenpeace carried out monitoring of individual PM2.5 exposure to nine volunteers in the Beijing area using individual samplers (with a duration of 22 days and 42 samples), and also entrusted the Public Health Faculty of Peking University to monitor PM2.5 in the air (for 15 days) on the 6th floor platform of their building. A series of detection and analysis tests were carried out, as well as on the samples from individuals.

Download the report below:

The Detection and Research on the Heavy Metal Concentration of PM2.5 in Beijing

Categories
No comments are found Add comment

Post a comment 

To post a comment you need to be signed in.