Europe - more climate talk than walk

Activists entered a heavily guarded EU summit to tell European leaders to boost their climate commitments to save a climate summit in Copenhagen.

The EU likes to present its climate policies as a model for global green development. In fact, its current target - to reduce carbon emissions by 20 percent by 2020 against 1990 levels - is shamefully unambitious and fails to provide an incentive for action or technological innovation. Having made over 17 percent reductions by 2009, the EU has years to make just a few percent reductions, a target it will meet under a business as usual scenario.

Greenpeace is calling on the EU to increase its domestic climate target to 30 percent as a first step. There are strong environmental and economic arguments for doing so. A study by Oxford and Sorbonne Universities, among others, found that a 30 percent target could create a net six million new European jobs by 2020. Shifting away from fossil fuels will help shield Europe’s economies from ever unstable fuel prices. These are among the reasons why Unilever, Philips, Google and Axa are among nearly 100 major companies now calling on EU governments to support a 30 percent climate target.

Less developed parts of the EU, particularly Central and Eastern Europe, can unlock significant investments in carbon reduction and energy modernisation under a 30 percent climate target. To achieve this, the EU should create financial mechanisms for this region to mobilise private investment in, for example, buildings renovation, industrial energy efficiency and energy infrastructure programmes. This would deliver fuel cost savings, energy security and new jobs.

Greenpeace advocates strengthening the EU Emissions Trading Scheme, which threatens to worsen rather than resolve Europe’s emissions. The EU should auction rather than give out free emission allowances, working within the market system to efficiently reduce the cost of climate action, maximise benefits and eliminate windfall profits. The scheme could and should be a driver for domestic emission reductions, geared to a 30 percent climate target. Any ‘carbon offset’ projects should be subject to strict criteria to guarantee real emissions cuts.

Internationally, the EU should be at the heart of a coalition to deliver a new international climate regime in the next years. This requires effective cooperation with progressive industrialised countries and emerging economies within and beyond the UN climate negotiations.

 

EU leadership could deliver headlines we would all be proud about

The latest updates

 

Rebuttal of the Economist leader article on European climate policy (edition dated 25...

Blog entry by Mark Breddy | January 24, 2014

The two main conclusions drawn by The Economist article – that binding renewables targets don’t work and that the EU should put all its eggs in the carbon market basket – don’t stand up to scrutiny. There’s very strong evidence...

European Commission wearing emperor's new clothes in Davos

Blog entry by Kaisa Kosonen | January 22, 2014

Climate change returned to the agenda of the World Economic Forum in Davos this year. And I expect the all-too-familiar placatory phrases will be back as well: it is  very  urgent and  very  serious; it is getting worse, and  “we”  or ...

Strong EU support for Arctic 30 does not go unnoticed

Blog entry by jdenblan | October 25, 2013

Parliaments in democracies the world over are places of vigorous discussion and sometimes fierce debate. Views on either side of the political spectrum are often radically divergent. With members from political parties in all of the...

Fixing EU biofuels policy

Blog entry by Sebastien Risso & Sini Harkki | September 9, 2013

The biofuel policy of the European Union is at a crossroads. Currently, an EU law mandates the use of biofuels largely made up of food crops that, instead of reducing emissions, have been shown to increase them. In trying to extinguish...

Car emissions thriller could end badly

Blog entry by Franziska Achterberg | December 17, 2012

When I see a bad thriller movie for the second or third time on a late-night TV re-run, rarely do I find it any more appealing: I already know the plot, I can remember the butler did it and I am reminded that, even the first time I saw...

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