Our 2012 numbers are in, and we're proud to say that 24 million people now subscribe to Greenpeace information or action alerts around the world. That's 24 million people who don't accept that cataclysmic climate change is acceptable, 24 million people ready to alert their networks to threats to the Earth's oceans and forests, 24 million people prepared to champion sustainable agriculture and a clean, renewable energy revolution.

greenpeace

We define a "Subscriber" as anyone who has given us permission to contact them, be it by email list, a cell phone number, as a Twitter follower, a "like" for one of our our Facebook pages or membership in any of dozens of social media channels we use. A little more than 1 in 10 of our subscribers are also active donors: 2.8 million, and 17,000 people donate time to us at least once a month around the world. Since we take no money from governments or corporations, those donors and volunteers are the lifeblood of the organisation, keeping our ships afloat and our activism in action.

greenpeace

Greenpeace has 27 national and regional offices in 44 countries. Our strongest fundraising bases are in the Germany, the Netherlands, and Switzerland. But the countries where we have the strongest reach within an internet population may surprise you: they're New Zealand, Argentina, Greece, and Turkey. 

In 2012 the Chinese microblogging site Weibo became our third largest source of subscribers among social media sites after Facebook and Twitter. As we shift more and more of our global programme and resources into the regions where the fate of the planet will be decided, watch for more growth from China, India, and Southeast Asia; Africa, the US, Russia, and Brazil.

greenpeace

If you are one of the 24 million people who helped share and amplify our stories and actions in 2012, or if you volunteered time or money, Thank You, Gracias, Merci, Danke, Obrogado, 谢谢.

You're part of something that the US National Intelligence Agency calls an "amorphous network" in its recent 2030 Alternative Worlds Report:

"The shift in national power may be overshadowed by an even more fundamental shift in the nature of power. Enabled by communications technologies, power will shift toward multifaceted and amorphous networks that will form to influence state and global action."

I like to think that we're each individual cells in a planet-wide organism looking to "influence state and global action" for the planet's future. It's an organism with a communications backbone that bypasses the corporate media, a central nervous system built of synapses that fire at the speed of tweets, and a global musculature of people willing to put their purchasing power, their creativity, and their social weight behind a simple idea: that there's a better way to run a planet.

If you're NOT yet part of this network, will you join us? Let's change the world together.

 


Brian Fitzgerald is Head of Digital Networking & Mobilisation at Greenpeace International.