Supporting green power

The Energy [R]evolution demonstrates how the world can get from where we are now, to where we need to be in terms of phasing out fossil fuels, cutting CO2 while ensuring energy security. This includes illustrating how the world’s carbon emissions from the energy and transport sectors alone can peak by 2015 and be cut by over 80 percent by 2050. This phase-out of fossil fuels offers substantial other benefits such as independence from world market fossil fuel prices as well as the creation of millions of new green jobs.

In India, because our energy infrastructure is not fully developed as yet, we have the opportunity to make the right choices today. We can choose between abundantly available renewable and sustainable energy that is the way the world is going to be powered in the future or the old, dirty energy technologies that will drive India’s dependence on foreign countries for supply of fuel, whether it is nuclear, coal or oil.

Decentralised renewable energy:

In an effort to bring about this revolution, Greenpeace India is working to promote Decentralized Renewable Energy (DRE).  Decentralised energy systems are based on the idea that energy doesn’t have to be generated in one giant centre and then transported long distances. It can be generated near the place it is needed, and often under the control of the people who will use it.

As decentralised energy system serves people locally, it will necessarily be smaller than the huge power stations in a centralised system.  Renewable energy technologies are ideally suited to this type of small-scale energy generation and have the advantage that they won’t pollute the air, water and land of the people who live nearby.  Renewable energy technologies also don’t generate greenhouse gases and therefore won’t exacerbate climate change.

In India, where the vast size of the country and the huge power deficits mean that most people – particularly those in rural areas – can’t rely on their electricity supply, DRE systems are particularly relevant.  The beauty of operating on such a small scale means that the energy supply can be designed to exactly suit the needs of the community it serves.

Depending on the natural resources available, people can choose to capture solar power, wind power, the power of moving water using micro-hydro technology, or a combination of all of three. There are many other forms of renewable energy present in the world too, and we’re getting better at capturing them. Systems can be isolated – these are called ‘stand-alone’ – or can even be connected to the main electricity grid – these are called ‘grid interactive’. Grid interactive systems have the advantage that the owners of the system can actually sell power to the grid if they generate excess, creating another source of income for them, or draw extra power if they find they ever need more.

Examples of DRE systems are cropping up all over India.  In Bihar, over one lakh people are using electricity made from waste rice husk.  In Ladakh, tribal communities are processing their farm produces with machines powered by micro-hydro. In Karnataka, villagers are cooking food on clean gas flames produced by cow manure. We’ve set out to document some examples such as these and will be posting the details soon.

The latest updates

 

Going Solar - A Great Investment Plan

Blog entry by Pujarini Sen | June 19, 2017

India is emerging as a world leader in solar. As the third largest solar market globally 1 , a market that is growing by 90%, making the potential of solar in our country quite tremendous. Prime Minister Modi inaugurated the...

Top Four Reasons You Should Go Solar

Blog entry by Grace Saji | June 2, 2017

1. Get paid  Image: media.tumblr Sell some of that electricity and get credited! 1 If you haven’t already heard about net metering, voila! Get your solar rooftop system connected to the main grid.  If you end up using lesser...

6 Funny Memes on Coal Power Companies' reactions to Truths

Blog entry by Grace Saji | May 26, 2017

1. Solar power is cheaper than power from a new coal plant. So there is no need for new coal power plants Image: kym-cdn 2. Solar expansion will disrupt coal power! The competition of solar power is so high that it could...

Boom and Bust 2017

Blog entry by Nicole Ghio | March 27, 2017

The Sierra Club, Greenpeace, and CoalSwarm released our third annual survey of proposed coal plants worldwide, Boom and Bust 2017: Tracking The Global Coal Plant Pipeline , and the results are staggering. Spoiler alert: if you are...

A visit to Timbaktu

Blog entry by Jaivin J | December 9, 2016

Day 1 - 13th October We started our travel as early as three in the morning  to the bus station. An unexpected Bangalore shower made our travel that much more difficult.  At the common meeting point, five of us stuffed ourselves...

Indo-Japanese Nuclear Agreement Amounts to Nuclear Proliferation in Asia

Press release | November 10, 2016 at 13:43

New Delhi/ Tokyo, 10 November 2016 --The signing of the Nuclear Cooperation Agreement between Japan and India, will not save Westinghouse/Toshiba’s failing nuclear business, nor will it deliver safe energy for the people of India. Instead, it...

Piyush Goyal’s Predicament

Press release | October 5, 2016 at 17:24

New Delhi| October 5, 2016| Greenpeace India lauds Power Minister Piyush Goyal for questioning the excessive past investments in coal, and for highlighting the ‘irrational investments in adding generating capacity’ under the previous government.

Overcapacity Sept 30, 2016

Press release | September 30, 2016 at 15:14

New Delhi| September 30, 2016| With India’s Cabinet signalling readiness to ratify the Paris Agreement on climate change, Greenpeace India is highlighting the threat posed to these commitments as well as to the economy, in particular the energy...

Are We Ready to Sustain the Right Choice?

Blog entry by Sunil Dahiya | September 7, 2016

India is standing at very interesting juncture today. From here onwards, there are two paths that can pave the way forward. The first one is to continue with the age old conventional dirty energy sources such as coal, while ignoring...

Bihar’s First Solar Powered Cold Storage in Kedia

Press release | August 13, 2016 at 18:35

Patna 13th August: Greenpeace volunteers celebrated alongside farmers in Kedia, as the Bihar Labour Resources Minister Vijay Prakash inaugurated the state’s first ever solar powered cold storage in Kedia, Jamui on Saturday.

1 - 10 of 365 results.

Categories