Supporting green power

The Energy [R]evolution demonstrates how the world can get from where we are now, to where we need to be in terms of phasing out fossil fuels, cutting CO2 while ensuring energy security. This includes illustrating how the world’s carbon emissions from the energy and transport sectors alone can peak by 2015 and be cut by over 80 percent by 2050. This phase-out of fossil fuels offers substantial other benefits such as independence from world market fossil fuel prices as well as the creation of millions of new green jobs.

In India, because our energy infrastructure is not fully developed as yet, we have the opportunity to make the right choices today. We can choose between abundantly available renewable and sustainable energy that is the way the world is going to be powered in the future or the old, dirty energy technologies that will drive India’s dependence on foreign countries for supply of fuel, whether it is nuclear, coal or oil.

Decentralised renewable energy:

In an effort to bring about this revolution, Greenpeace India is working to promote Decentralized Renewable Energy (DRE).  Decentralised energy systems are based on the idea that energy doesn’t have to be generated in one giant centre and then transported long distances. It can be generated near the place it is needed, and often under the control of the people who will use it.

As decentralised energy system serves people locally, it will necessarily be smaller than the huge power stations in a centralised system.  Renewable energy technologies are ideally suited to this type of small-scale energy generation and have the advantage that they won’t pollute the air, water and land of the people who live nearby.  Renewable energy technologies also don’t generate greenhouse gases and therefore won’t exacerbate climate change.

In India, where the vast size of the country and the huge power deficits mean that most people – particularly those in rural areas – can’t rely on their electricity supply, DRE systems are particularly relevant.  The beauty of operating on such a small scale means that the energy supply can be designed to exactly suit the needs of the community it serves.

Depending on the natural resources available, people can choose to capture solar power, wind power, the power of moving water using micro-hydro technology, or a combination of all of three. There are many other forms of renewable energy present in the world too, and we’re getting better at capturing them. Systems can be isolated – these are called ‘stand-alone’ – or can even be connected to the main electricity grid – these are called ‘grid interactive’. Grid interactive systems have the advantage that the owners of the system can actually sell power to the grid if they generate excess, creating another source of income for them, or draw extra power if they find they ever need more.

Examples of DRE systems are cropping up all over India.  In Bihar, over one lakh people are using electricity made from waste rice husk.  In Ladakh, tribal communities are processing their farm produces with machines powered by micro-hydro. In Karnataka, villagers are cooking food on clean gas flames produced by cow manure. We’ve set out to document some examples such as these and will be posting the details soon.

The latest updates

 

Strongest Climate warning yet demands action

Feature story | February 6, 2007 at 11:04

With the strongest warnings yet from the international scientific community on the threat of dangerous climate change just published, it's clearly time to match strengths of scientific warnings with determined action to reduce greenhouse gas...

Greenpeace sounds Climate Change Alarm at the Ardh Kumbh Mela

Press release | February 2, 2007 at 4:30

ALLAHABAD/NEW DELHI, India — Greenpeace challenged Governments to step up to the plate and take immediate action, after the strongest warnings yet from the international scientific community on the threat of dangerous climate change unless...

The energy [r]evolution starts here

Feature story | January 25, 2007 at 16:33

Tackling dangerous climate change is the biggest challenge facing us all. Fortunately there is an answer to this challenge. Our report: ‘energy [r]evolution’, details how to halve global CO2 emissions by 2050, using existing technology and still...

Launch of the world's first comprehensive global energy strategy for tackling climate...

Press release | January 25, 2007 at 4:30

NEW DELHI, India — Renewable energy, combined with efficiencies from the 'smart use' of energy, can deliver half of the world's energy needs by 2050, according to one of the most comprehensive plans for future sustainable energy provision,...

Doomsday Clock ticks closer to midnight

Feature story | January 24, 2007 at 12:22

The spectre of a nuclear war 60 years ago was what created the "doomsday clock," the Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists'(BAS) cold war chronometer. The closer the clock to midnight, the closer the world was creeping toward disaster. These days,...

Solar Generation celebrates the spirit of youth against climate change with the...

Press release | October 24, 2006 at 3:30

BANGALORE, India — Solar Generation joins hands with young people from across Bangalore celebrating youth resistance against climate change. Solar Generation is the youth-wing of Greenpeace India demanding clean energy now! It was launched on...

Asian Development Bank announces Clean Energy Fund: Not enough, says Greenpeace.

Press release | May 6, 2006 at 3:30

HYDERABAD, India — As a direct result of intense campaigning by Greenpeace and the Solar Generation during the 39th Annual Meeting of the Asian Development Bank, the ADB today announced a “pipeline of clean energy projects worth $1 billion by...

Solar Generation

Press release | May 5, 2006 at 3:30

HYDERABAD, India — There’s something about obvious truths that make them invisible to those in power. For instance, the fact that the ADB refuses to see that by funding coal power projects, they are, in fact, funding climate change. That their...

ADB asked to stop funding dirty energy projects

Press release | May 4, 2006 at 19:07

Thai civil society groups challenged the Asian Development Bank (ADB)to stop funding socially and environmentally harmful projects at its upcoming Annual General Meeting.

Greenpeace challenges ADB to choose: Irrelevance or Leadership?

Press release | May 4, 2006 at 3:30

HYDERABAD, India — Borrowing words from a Buddhist tenet Greenpeace activists unfurled a banner that read: “There are only two mistakes one can make in fighting climate change: not starting, and not going all the way!”

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