Supporting green power

The Energy [R]evolution demonstrates how the world can get from where we are now, to where we need to be in terms of phasing out fossil fuels, cutting CO2 while ensuring energy security. This includes illustrating how the world’s carbon emissions from the energy and transport sectors alone can peak by 2015 and be cut by over 80 percent by 2050. This phase-out of fossil fuels offers substantial other benefits such as independence from world market fossil fuel prices as well as the creation of millions of new green jobs.

In India, because our energy infrastructure is not fully developed as yet, we have the opportunity to make the right choices today. We can choose between abundantly available renewable and sustainable energy that is the way the world is going to be powered in the future or the old, dirty energy technologies that will drive India’s dependence on foreign countries for supply of fuel, whether it is nuclear, coal or oil.

Decentralised renewable energy:

In an effort to bring about this revolution, Greenpeace India is working to promote Decentralized Renewable Energy (DRE).  Decentralised energy systems are based on the idea that energy doesn’t have to be generated in one giant centre and then transported long distances. It can be generated near the place it is needed, and often under the control of the people who will use it.

As decentralised energy system serves people locally, it will necessarily be smaller than the huge power stations in a centralised system.  Renewable energy technologies are ideally suited to this type of small-scale energy generation and have the advantage that they won’t pollute the air, water and land of the people who live nearby.  Renewable energy technologies also don’t generate greenhouse gases and therefore won’t exacerbate climate change.

In India, where the vast size of the country and the huge power deficits mean that most people – particularly those in rural areas – can’t rely on their electricity supply, DRE systems are particularly relevant.  The beauty of operating on such a small scale means that the energy supply can be designed to exactly suit the needs of the community it serves.

Depending on the natural resources available, people can choose to capture solar power, wind power, the power of moving water using micro-hydro technology, or a combination of all of three. There are many other forms of renewable energy present in the world too, and we’re getting better at capturing them. Systems can be isolated – these are called ‘stand-alone’ – or can even be connected to the main electricity grid – these are called ‘grid interactive’. Grid interactive systems have the advantage that the owners of the system can actually sell power to the grid if they generate excess, creating another source of income for them, or draw extra power if they find they ever need more.

Examples of DRE systems are cropping up all over India.  In Bihar, over one lakh people are using electricity made from waste rice husk.  In Ladakh, tribal communities are processing their farm produces with machines powered by micro-hydro. In Karnataka, villagers are cooking food on clean gas flames produced by cow manure. We’ve set out to document some examples such as these and will be posting the details soon.

The latest updates

 

Fact finding team documents coal-induced displacement and destruction in Singrauli

Press release | September 15, 2011 at 15:00

New Delhi, 15 September, 2011: ‘Singrauli: The Coal Curse’ a report was released today by retired Justice Suresh Hosbet, a member of a Fact Finding team that visited the area in July this year. (1) The report documented the impacts of unbridled...

Singrauli: The Coal Curse

Publication | September 15, 2011 at 14:54

Greenpeace organised a Fact Finding Mission to Singrauli – the energy capital of the country and home to tribal communities, forest dwellers and some of the most threatened forests remaining in Central India. The Singrauli region spreads across...

Why should you be talking to the planning commission on Facebook?

Blog entry by Arpana Udupa | September 9, 2011

The Planning Commission is supposedly listening! The Planning Commission and their partner India@75’s Facebook pages are open to receiving your suggestions on what the 12th Five Year Plan should look like. This is the Planning...

92,805 people want forests to be saved

Image gallery | August 25, 2011

Shell less than transparent about worst UK oil spill in a decade

Blog entry by Bex | August 18, 2011

As I write, Shell is working to contain an oil spill off the Aberdeenshire coast that is already, reportedly , the worst spill in UK waters for over a decade. As well as indulging in some shameless greenwashing (Shell is choosing...

Vodafone sets precedent – publicly discloses carbon emissions

Press release | August 9, 2011 at 15:34

New Delhi/Bangalore, August 9th, 2011: Greenpeace welcomes the disclosure of carbon emissions by Vodafone-Essar through their first-ever sustainability report 'Footprint 2010-11' which was released yesterday (1). In the absence of any statutory...

Airtel it’s time to act

Blog entry by Akshey Kalra | July 4, 2011

I remember when my dad bought one of those ancient stone age cell phones at a time when they were not a necessity. I was amazed! A phone with no wires, expensive calls, the fact that I could call my dad whenever I wanted and most...

Will Sunil Mittal commit to clean energy?

Blog entry by Abhishek Pratap | June 22, 2011

Finally the day had come. It was time to meet Bharti Airtel’s senior management to discuss their diesel phase out and adoption of clean energy plan for its business operation. They had agreed to meet us and discuss these demands after...

About 16,000 individuals send mail to the Chairman Bharti Airtel

Press release | June 21, 2011 at 16:26

New Delhi, June 20th, 2011- Disappointed over breakdown of talks between Greenpeace and telecom giant Bharti Airtel after the latter backtracked from its earlier assurance of committing to a timeline for disclosing carbon emission and a clean...

Being foolish for a smart future

Blog entry by Reema Ganguly | June 21, 2011

“I’m a fool for forests,” chimed Darsheel Safary. His shining eyes and naughty smile beamed into the camera. It took him less than five minutes to absorb the script and without a fuss we had a perfect take. “Support Greenpeace and save...

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