Supporting green power

The Energy [R]evolution demonstrates how the world can get from where we are now, to where we need to be in terms of phasing out fossil fuels, cutting CO2 while ensuring energy security. This includes illustrating how the world’s carbon emissions from the energy and transport sectors alone can peak by 2015 and be cut by over 80 percent by 2050. This phase-out of fossil fuels offers substantial other benefits such as independence from world market fossil fuel prices as well as the creation of millions of new green jobs.

In India, because our energy infrastructure is not fully developed as yet, we have the opportunity to make the right choices today. We can choose between abundantly available renewable and sustainable energy that is the way the world is going to be powered in the future or the old, dirty energy technologies that will drive India’s dependence on foreign countries for supply of fuel, whether it is nuclear, coal or oil.

Decentralised renewable energy:

In an effort to bring about this revolution, Greenpeace India is working to promote Decentralized Renewable Energy (DRE).  Decentralised energy systems are based on the idea that energy doesn’t have to be generated in one giant centre and then transported long distances. It can be generated near the place it is needed, and often under the control of the people who will use it.

As decentralised energy system serves people locally, it will necessarily be smaller than the huge power stations in a centralised system.  Renewable energy technologies are ideally suited to this type of small-scale energy generation and have the advantage that they won’t pollute the air, water and land of the people who live nearby.  Renewable energy technologies also don’t generate greenhouse gases and therefore won’t exacerbate climate change.

In India, where the vast size of the country and the huge power deficits mean that most people – particularly those in rural areas – can’t rely on their electricity supply, DRE systems are particularly relevant.  The beauty of operating on such a small scale means that the energy supply can be designed to exactly suit the needs of the community it serves.

Depending on the natural resources available, people can choose to capture solar power, wind power, the power of moving water using micro-hydro technology, or a combination of all of three. There are many other forms of renewable energy present in the world too, and we’re getting better at capturing them. Systems can be isolated – these are called ‘stand-alone’ – or can even be connected to the main electricity grid – these are called ‘grid interactive’. Grid interactive systems have the advantage that the owners of the system can actually sell power to the grid if they generate excess, creating another source of income for them, or draw extra power if they find they ever need more.

Examples of DRE systems are cropping up all over India.  In Bihar, over one lakh people are using electricity made from waste rice husk.  In Ladakh, tribal communities are processing their farm produces with machines powered by micro-hydro. In Karnataka, villagers are cooking food on clean gas flames produced by cow manure. We’ve set out to document some examples such as these and will be posting the details soon.

The latest updates

 

Comments and suggestions on the DERC proposal on Net Metering and Connectivity with...

Publication | December 17, 2013 at 12:55

This is a letter to the Delhi Electricity Regulatory Commission (DERC) of New Delhi, India from Greenpeace.

Manifesto Report card

Publication | November 26, 2013 at 16:40

In 2013, Greenpeace India began the Switch on the Sun campaign in Delhi highlighting the states poor performance on the Renewable energy purchase obligation (RPO) of 0.01%. Followed by it we unveiled the “Rooftop Revolution- Unleashing Delhi’s...

Powering Ahead with Renewables

Publication | April 22, 2013 at 14:30

In the backdrop of a persistent power crisis and raging coal scam, Greenpeace today released its assessment report on Renewable Purchase Obligation (RPO) titled “Powering Ahead with Renewables: Leaders and Laggards”, which ranks performance of...

Energy [R]evolution 2nd Edition

Publication | November 16, 2012 at 15:30

The second edition of India Energy [R]evolution in 2012 provides a practical pathway for India to secure its energy particularly electricity supply to achieve its long-term ambitious economic growth along with providing access to modern...

Study of Impact of the Presidential Directive to Coal India

Publication | October 4, 2012 at 12:09

Greenpeace commissioned Equitorials, a financial research firm, to do an independent analysis of the financial impact of signing Fuel Supply Agreements(FSA) on Coal India Limited. This analysis has been done in the context of the Presidential...

Smart Energy Access report

Publication | May 15, 2012 at 16:07

Energy is central to nearly every major challenge and opportunity the world faces today. The energy shortage is most acute among India’s rural poor and in states such as Bihar, where more than 80% of the population still live in the rural...

Agenda for the conference

Publication | May 14, 2012 at 18:00

The international business conference on 15th May at Hotel Maurya, Patna, Bihar focuses specifically on the issue of DRE and energy access. The conference intends to bring global perspectives on driving investment and various other frameworks...

Empowering Bihar: Policy pathway for energy access

Publication | January 24, 2012 at 13:11

The state of Bihar has witnessed a promising growth in the recent years and is set to tread for significant economic advancement in the years to come. At this juncture what Bihar needs to propel its growth further is to meet the electricity...

Singrauli: The Coal Curse

Publication | September 15, 2011 at 14:54

Greenpeace organised a Fact Finding Mission to Singrauli – the energy capital of the country and home to tribal communities, forest dwellers and some of the most threatened forests remaining in Central India. The Singrauli region spreads across...

Dirty Talking - A case for telecom to shift from diesel to renewable

Publication | May 21, 2011 at 12:45

India is now the second largest of the global telecom markets and is projected to overtake China. The telecom industry has attracted eight per cent of the cumulative foreign direct investment (FDI) over the last two years, with a cumulative flow...

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