Nuclear accidents in India

An independent regulatory board is supposed to be protecting the health of people and environment, not the nuclear establishment.  So why isn’t it?

The secrecy that shrouds the civilian nuclear industry in India makes it almost impossible for citizens to know accurately the details of accidents that have occurred, or indeed sometimes whether accidents have occurred at all.  Yet the sector teems with rumours and eyewitness accounts of near-misses, leaks, cracks, radiation exposures and safety violations.

The costs paid by Indian citizens, in both health and environment, seem to be far greater than the meager 2.7% of electricity currently provided by India’s civilian nuclear sector (1).  An even greater injustice is that it is often the same factions of society - the nameless day labourers who are not educated in the dangers of radiation - that are brought in to clear up the mess, as are then overlooked when it comes to distributing reliable supplies of electricity.

The frequency and similarity of many of these incidents and accidents is disturbing.  It discredits the Department of Atomic Energy as the head of a nuclear industry, and the ability of the AERB to ensure safety in that industry.

Read about some accidents at nuclear power plants in India dating back to 1991 here.

In addition to all nuclear power facilities the Atomic Energy Regulatory Board (AERB) must also ensure the safety of India’s 52,000-plus radiological facilities.  These include medical institutions, industrial uses, and research facilities, and safety violations happen at them, too.  The most serious incident to date is Mayapuri in 2010, in which a cobalt-60 source was sold and taken apart in a scrapyard, killing one man and hospitalising seven others.


Notes
1 As of April 2011. Central Electricity Authority http://www.cea.nic.in/

The latest updates

 

Greenpeace India - Coming Soon to a City Near You

Feature story | July 1, 2004 at 3:30

BANGALORE, India — July 2004: Bangalore, Mumbai, Chennai, New Delhi and now Pune, Hyderabad and Chandigarh! Although our campaigns take our work to many different parts of the country, we have seven offices dedicated to the Direct Dialogue...

Nukes out of NATO

Feature story | June 28, 2004 at 3:30

ISTANBUL, Turkey — The NATO summit and its attendant world leaders rolled into Istanbul this week. While the rhetoric is of peace, the North Atlantic Treaty Organisation's (NATO) version includes a constant nuclear threat. We are highlighting the...

Esperanza in Iceland

Feature story | June 24, 2004 at 3:30

HUSAVIK, Iceland — One day, our ship is docked in Iceland's number one whaling station. The next, the country's number one whale-watching spot. The contrast is striking. Isafjordur, in the stunning west fjords on the northwestern coast, is a...

Greenpeace activists plant signposts outside

Image | June 23, 2004 at 4:30

Greenpeace activists plant signposts outside chemical industries, urging them to disclose all hazardous materials used in their process.

Exxon secrets

Feature story | June 22, 2004 at 3:30

WASHINGTON, DC, United States — The secret's out. Climate sceptics being funded by ExxonMobil can no longer hide behind the name of a front group. A new website - www.exxonsecrets.org - exposes the links between ExxonMobil money and the think...

Greenpeace launches it’s “Save our Lakes” Campaign at Patancheru

Feature story | June 18, 2004 at 3:30

HYDERABAD, India — On the 17th of June, 2004 Greenpeace launched it’s “Save our Lakes” campaign at Patancheru, Andhra Pradesh by introducing community science to the villagers of Kazipally and Gandigudam. VJ Jose, the Greenpeace Riverkeeper from...

M

Image | June 17, 2004 at 4:30

M.J. Jose, our River Keeper, sampling water from the Patancheru lake for toxins

Samsung cleans up

Feature story | June 17, 2004 at 3:30

Consumer power scored another victory recently with the announcement from electronics giant Samsung that it plans to phase out hazardous chemicals in its products. Seeing its brand-name products graded red - as containing hazardous chemicals - on...

Ge activists make themselves heard in Rome

Feature story | June 16, 2004 at 3:30

ROME, Italy — Attendees of the World Food Business Summit in Rome, Italy were 'welcomed' today by hundreds of audio messages from consumers in all 25 EU nations saying that they didn't want GE in their food.

1871 - 1880 of 2054 results.