Protecting our coasts

From the dense mangroves in the Sunderbans and the nesting sea turtles in Orissa to the majestic whale sharks in the Gulf of Kutch and the breathtaking coral reefs in Lakshadweep, India’s 8,000-km-long coastline is a treasure trove of marine life. These waters are also spawning and breeding ground for a variety of fish. The countries fisheries industry has thrived for centuries thanks to the richness of its marine life.

In spite of all this, India’s ocean environment has been neglected. Within the political system, understanding on this issue is either limited or poor and the policy focus is ad hoc. Even with the limited information available it is quite clear that the country’s coast line and marine environment is under threat.

The execution of massive projects such as ports with inadequate assessments of their impacts on the local environment and the livelihoods they sustain is a matter of serious concern. The 11th Five Year Plan has identified 331 ports for development on the mainland. That’s the equivalent of having a port every 20 km or so along India’s 6,000-km-long mainland coast.  

The cumulative impacts of these ports on the environment have not been assessed and their economic advantage is not known as half of the ports in the country are under utilised.

Apart from endangering marine habitats, this also poses a significant threat to the livelihoods of coastal communities. Fisheries resources in several parts of the country are under severe stress. By offering a variety of subsidies and incentives, governments at the centre and state level have allowed too many mechanised boats to operate, resulting in too many boats chasing too few fish.

 Campaign story:

The campaign for oceans is currently focused on three specific areas:

  1. Coastal development: Coastal real estate is most prized for tourism, industries, aquaculture, nuclear and thermal power plants or ports, all of which leave behind a devastated coastal environment. The Coastal Regulation Zone (CRZ) Notification 1991 was meant to protect our coasts but has failed to do so. Greenpeace is demanding that the notification be strengthened and implemented and industries and infrastructure projects be kept away from eco-sensitive areas.

  2. Overfishing: Increasingly, a wide range of marine ecologists and scientists think that the biggest single threat to marine ecosystems today is overfishing. The appetite for fish is exceeding the ocean’s ecological limits with devastating impacts on marine ecosystems. Scientists are warning that overfishing could result in profound changes in our oceans, perhaps changing them forever.

  3. Marine reserves: Our oceans are in need of protection – from overfishing, pollution, mining and other threats. Marine reserves are an important tool to protect and preserve areas of our oceans that are rich in biodiversity, ecologically significant and vulnerable to destruction. These areas are closed to all extractive uses, such as fishing, mining, oil exploration, waste dumping etc.

The latest updates

 

India must get its own house in order on biodiversity

Blog entry by Vanessa Atkinson | October 11, 2012

It's hard to throw a party and expect your guests to behave better than you do. Yet that is exactly what the Indian government is doing as it hosts a major international conference on biodiversity in Hyderabad. There's a word for that...

Identifying Conservation Needs in India's Offshore Waters

Publication | August 21, 2012 at 15:07

At Rio+20, a global summit on sustainable development which took place in June 2012, the international community pledged to re-double efforts for conservation and restoration of the seas. India now has the opportunity to show the world its own...

A case for protecting India's fisheries

Image gallery | June 8, 2012

Safeguard or Squander?

Publication | June 8, 2012 at 13:00

India's marine fisheries are in a state of crisis, despite official statements that there is still scope or fish landings to increase. 90% of India's fish resources are at or above maximum sustainable levels of exploitation.

F***ing in India: how not to manage a fisheries system

Blog entry by Areeba Hamid | March 9, 2012

The Indian government's Letter of Permit (LoP) scheme stands out as the textbook example of how not to manage a fisheries system. In fact, constant abuse of the scheme, too many loopholes and tardy monitoring and implementation has...

What I talk about when I talk about F***ing

Blog entry by Areeba Hamid | February 15, 2012

I am on the Greenpeace ship Esperanza, en route to Port Blair right now. It has been fantastic to sail from Singapore to India (took us 5 days) and calming to have just the never ending ocean stretched out before you every time you...

Sailing on the Espy - Day One

Blog entry by Lochan Baratakke | February 10, 2012

After a rather sleepless overnight flight from Chennai to Singapore - thanks, in part, to two relentless crying babies on-board - it didn't take long before we were driven off to the shipyard where the Esperanza was docked. We were...

Fishermen at Chilika say, “Protect Ecology and Right to Fish.”

Blog entry by Deven Digwal | August 10, 2011

Chilika is an integral part of the culture of coastal Orissa. Covering a vast area of more than 1000 sq km Chilika is the largest brackish water lagoon in Asia. Some of the very rare species of flora, fauna, mammals and birds are...

Gupti public hearing proves it's better late than never

Blog entry by Areeba Hamid | June 27, 2011

When I realised that the venue we had picked for the second public hearing at Gupti village was the same where Hon’ble Minister Jairam Ramesh conducted his meeting before his decision on POSCO, I didn’t know whether I should be...

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