Cutting carbon emissions

Coal fired power plants are the biggest source of manmade CO2 emissions. This makes coal energy the single greatest threat our climate faces. In India up to 40 percent of our current CO2 emissions comes from coal fired power stations.

To avoid the worst impacts of climate change, including widespread drought, flooding and massive population displacement caused by rising sea levels, we need to keep global temperature rise below 2ºC (compared to pre-industrial levels). To do this, global greenhouse gases emission must peak by 2015 and go down to zero from there.

India is the third largest emitter of carbon dioxide after China and the US. Its emissions are expected to have significant growth over the next 20 years or so. Our emissions come from various activities but the largest share is from the electricity sector because of the way we produce most of our electricity today.

Coal based power plants produce 70 percent of our electricity needs and 40 percent of our total carbon dioxide emissions. If we want to play a significant, responsible role in tackling climate change, we must lead the way by reducing our dependence on coal and finding newer, cleaner ways to produce electricity.

Campaign story:

Our coal campaign highlights the impacts of coal in our energy mix, on the people and environment. We have an opportunity to build the energy infrastructure of the future and must seize it.

There is a huge surge in coal mining and the number of coal fired power plants in the guise of meeting electricity demands and development for the country. However coal cannot deliver India’s growth and development aspirations beyond a few years. It is neither a secure nor a sustainable energy option.

In fact it is a risky investment for the industries and the government. The campaign will demonstrate that supply of coal is severely limited by social and economical factors, making it a dead investment in the medium and long term. The campaign will also make the case that going down the coal route will be costly for India’s global image and long term development interests.

Limited coal:

A lot of our coal is found under the few remaining heavily forested areas of our country or where there are a large number of people living. To get to the coal we must either cut down the forests and/or displace large numbers of people from these regions. When people are displaced, they need to be rehabilitated to similar places where they can rebuild their lives. Given that land is not easy to come by we will not be able to provide people replacements for what they are expected to lose.

So while we theoretically have a lot of coal, there are unacceptable things that may be done to actually be able to use it. Therefore, we must stop looking at coal as an option and start by reducing our dependence on it beginning right now.

We will investigate and publicise the true cost of coal and urge people and policy makers to make the right choices.

The latest updates

 

The Ghosts of Coal

Blog entry by Sajan Ponappa | April 21, 2017

The Ghosts of Coal is a photo-blog which describes the environmental and health problems caused by coal-fired thermal power plants.

No fleeing the fly ash curse for Kuruvimedu residents

Blog entry by Karthikeyan Hemalatha | April 5, 2017

A version of this blog was first published on Times of India . Finding Kuruvimedu isn’t easy. It is not on Google Maps. People on the main road didn’t seem to be aware of such a village. Tucked behind NTPC’s coal-based thermal...

India's Efforts to Tackle Air Pollution - Mere Tokenism

Blog entry by Nandikesh Sivalingam | March 11, 2017

Thermal power plants are one of the major causes of air pollution in the country, especially in the Indo Gangetic Plain region (IGP). In December 2015, the Indian Government came out with a strict emission notification to control...

The Holy City of Pollution

Blog entry by Apoorva Singh | March 6, 2017

Walking down the ghats isn’t what it used to be. Morning walks along the ganges isn’t a spiritual experience anymore as black toxic fumes from burning garbage dumped on the roadside emanate throughout the city. The holy city of...

From Coal to Solar Goals

Blog entry by Sunil Dahiya | February 21, 2017

Air pollution has been highlighted time and again as the major health emergency that India has faced in the recent times, only now, it got seriously severe. All of us by now have acknowledged that this health hazard is not just the...

A visit to Timbaktu

Blog entry by Jaivin J | December 9, 2016

Day 1 - 13th October We started our travel as early as three in the morning  to the bus station. An unexpected Bangalore shower made our travel that much more difficult.  At the common meeting point, five of us stuffed ourselves...

Are We Ready to Sustain the Right Choice?

Blog entry by Sunil Dahiya | September 7, 2016

India is standing at very interesting juncture today. From here onwards, there are two paths that can pave the way forward. The first one is to continue with the age old conventional dirty energy sources such as coal, while ignoring...

Switch On The Sun- Greenpeace India Applauds Delhi Government Adoption Of Solar...

Feature story | June 7, 2016 at 17:03

New Delhi | 7th June 2016| Delhi got its much awaited solar policy on Monday. The Delhi government unveiled and approved the solar policy in the cabinet meeting.

How India’s Coal Power Expansion Triggered An Air Pollution Crisis

Blog entry by Lauri Myllyvirta | May 25, 2016

In New Delhi, where drivers routinely turn on their emergency indicators to be seen in the winter smog, the air pollution debate has largely focused on two sources of air pollution: cars inside the city and agricultural waste-burning...

No Trees, No Future, Save KBR

Blog entry by Ali Abbas | May 16, 2016

Amid the record high temperature that Hyderabad is facing this summer, news broke out that the Greater Hyderabad Municipal Corporation ( GHMC)  is planning to chop down 3100 trees across city to widen the roads and lay the flyovers. We...

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