Enabling IT innovations

The scientific urgency of climate change demands that we need a clean energy revolution, not a slow transition. Simply making the current dirty energy platform smarter or more modern is not enough to reach the level of reductions needed. We need a revolution in the way we produce and consume energy.

The clean energy revolution can only be catalyzed by the Information and Communication Technology (ICT) sector due to its unique position of being able to provide wide scale solutions needed to cut greenhouse gas emissions and create low carbon economies needed in the future. This is a win-win situation for the sector - the planet gains from IT solutions; the companies gain from providing these solutions.

Greenpeace has been interacting with the ICT sector and has got it to actively consider ways of reducing its role in runaway climate change. In 2009, we released the Cool IT Challenge assessment report. It ranked 12 global ICT brands on issues of climate leadership and business solutions to control climate change. Greenpeace has thrown the challenge and looks forward to a revolution within the ICT sector.

Campaign story:

The power of ICT as future solution provider contrasts with its rising carbon footprint. Indian ICT sector is responsible for 10 % of global ICT emission and with an annual growth rate of 12-16 % this will further grow to make India second largest carbon emitter after China by 2020.

A rapid increase in demand for online services is increasing the number of data-centers and network towers. While companies have been focusing on efficiency to cut enterprise costs, their growth offsets efficiency gains made in new IT infrastructure. Further, these also widen the existing gap in demand – supply of energy.

Greenpeace therefore plans to identify the critical consequence of ICT’s growing footprint in general to expose the link between growing ICT infrastructure and increased expansion of fossil based power generation. This will help establish the fact that the current business as usual approach will not sustain business growth in a climate constrained scenario. Therefore, the companies need to decouple their growth from emission and invest in low-carbon energy sources.

The latest updates

 

Greenpeace activists erect a giant robot

Image | March 9, 2006 at 4:30

Greenpeace activists erect a giant robot made from electronic components at the entrance of the world's largest electronics fair, CeBit in Hannover, Germany. The protest is to remind the electronic industry leaders gathering that while the...

WTO: The real face of free trade

Feature story | December 12, 2005 at 8:30

HONG KONG, China — A child sits in a mountain of electronic waste, covered in toxic chemicals, pulling apart components to retrieve tiny bits of metal; this is the face of free trade your government does not want you to see. As trade ministers...

Applied Thought! Wipro ready to meet Greenpeace challenge?

Feature story | November 23, 2005 at 4:30

BANGALORE, India — When large corporations are challenged to change their business practices, they usually respond grudgingly, with tentative, half-baked measures – especially if the change benefits the planet, not necessarily their bottom lines.

Wipro, Apply Thought!

Feature story | September 5, 2005 at 3:30

BANGALORE, India — A relatively new but deadly waste stream is exploding in our midst -Electronic scrap or E-waste. Bangalore, the IT centre of India, alone generates over 8000 tonnes of e-waste loaded with toxic chemicals and heavy metals that...

E-waste at the manufacturers gates!

Image | September 5, 2005 at 3:30

E-waste at the manufacturers gates!

LG takes up the toxic tech challenge

Feature story | August 23, 2005 at 13:11

"Life's Good" might be the LG motto but life just got a whole lot better for the planet after LG electronics announced that they are committing to eliminating toxic chemicals from their entire consumer electronics range.

Reality Bytes – Hi-tech products pollute scrap yards in Asia

Feature story | August 18, 2005 at 3:30

NEW DELHI, India — Got your hands on a brand new cellphone, computer, wide-screen TV? If yes, do you know where the old one went? In all probability, to one of many ‘recycling yards’; usually small-scale operations carried out in cramped brick...

Young workers at an e

Image | August 17, 2005 at 12:59

Young workers at an e-waste recycling yard in Delhi.

Map of Asia showing where e

Image | August 17, 2005 at 10:56

Map of Asia showing where e-waste is imported and recycling sites in China and India.

Pulling the plug on dirty electronics

Feature story | May 24, 2005 at 3:30

GENEVA, Switzerland — What happens to your mobile or computer when you throw it away? Did you know it could end up dumped in Asia and scrapped by hand in appalling conditions? This shouldn't be happening, so we are pressuring one of the biggest...

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