Ending deforestation

Indonesia's rainforests shelter an amazingly rich number of plant and animal species, many of which occur nowhere else on earth. The orang-utan, Sumatran tiger and the world's largest flower, the one metre Wide Rafflesia, all call the Paradise Forests their home. The human communities inhabiting these forests have deep cultural, spiritual and physical connections to the forest for thousands of years. The diversity of these cultures is extraordinary.

Indonesia is now the world’s third largest greenhouse gas emitter, after China and the US, despite its relatively small area and population.  Deforestation and peat land destruction are the reasons why – up to four percent of global greenhouse gases  are estimated to come from the destruction of Indonesia’s peat lands. The palm oil industry is acknowledged as one of the primary drivers of deforestation and peat destruction, along with the pulp paper and mining industries.

Palm oil is used as cheap cooking oil and in most processed foods (chocolates, ice creams, instant foods, baked goods etc), in cosmetics, soaps and a number of other products. India has emerged as a key market for Indonesian palm oil, surpassing China as the world’s largest importer in 2009. Indian demand for this commodity is spurring expansion of plantations into forest and peat land areas.

As part of its campaign towards zero deforestation, Greenpeace is calling for a moratorium on all deforestation and peat land destruction in Indonesia, and is asking all companies purchasing palm oil to sever links with suppliers known to be involved in deforestation and peat land destruction.

Campaign story

Globally, a string of large corporations including Unilever, Kraft, Mars and Nestle have made commitments to sustainable palm oil sourcing in response to public pressure over the issue of deforestation and peat land destruction.

In India, Greenpeace is asking all importers of palm oil to ensure that their supplies are not linked to deforestation or peat destruction, and to support a moratorium on forest clearance in Indonesia. It is essential that Indian companies and the Indian public let Indonesian producers know that they do not want palm oil that is linked to deforestation or peat destruction. Under a moratorium, the palm oil industry is free to continue operations on existing plantations, and expand in non-forest areas. But deforestation and peat destruction must stop.

The latest updates

 

Pulling back the shower curtain: Find out about P&G's dirty secret!

Blog entry by Bustar Maitar | February 28, 2014

Procter & Gamble claims that nearly 5 billion people use its products, among them the anti-dandruff shampoo Head & Shoulders. But what's not so squeaky clean is that P&G is making those billions of consumers unknowingly part of an...

How L’Oreal committed to the ultimate makeover

Blog entry by Areeba Hamid | January 31, 2014

The world’s largest beauty and cosmetics company, L’Oreal, has made a landmark promise to remove forest destruction from the products they sell. "Because I'm Worth It" is a catchy slogan coined 40 years ago by the French cosmetics...

Will you help us Protect Paradise in 2014?

Blog entry by Bustar Maitar | January 24, 2014

When I read the daily newspaper here in Indonesia, it’s rare that there is not at least one big scandal or   exposé   related to the forest sector. Just this last weekend, land conflicts in a Kalimantan palm oil plantation made...

Wilmar finally commits to No Deforestation

Feature story | December 10, 2013 at 16:38

Let us recap what happened in the last week. The world mourned the sad demise of Nelson Mandela, probably the biggest proponent of peace and human rights of our era. Much awaited results of the 2013 assembly elections were declared. And in...

You did it! Palm oil giant commits to No Deforestation!

Blog entry by Bustar Maitar | December 7, 2013

‘Effective immediately, Wilmar will not engage in development of HCS, HCV, or peat, nor knowingly source from suppliers engaged in development of HCS, HCV, or peat.’ Wilmar International - the world's biggest palm oil company - has...

Floods in Uttarakhand: people and ecology suffer

Blog entry by Shashwat Raj and Paul Horseman | June 24, 2013

Today in Uttarakhand and Himachal Pradesh, we are witnessing one of the worst man-made calamities in recent times. A disastrous cycle of events has led to floods that have already killed many people and displaced many more from their...

Protecting Indonesia’s forests is a global responsibility.

Blog entry by Pari Trivedi | May 22, 2013

Kwatisore is a tiny coastal hamlet in Papua, Indonesia, famous for the fragrant bark of Gaharu and Moso’oi trees that grow here. For the people of Kwatisore, the business from the trees is not only their main source of income but also...

Indonesia: the land of pristine forests

Blog entry by Pari Trivedi | May 9, 2013

The Sentani lake with the Cyclops mountain in the background 'The mist is the breath of the forests', said Godi Utama, my Indonesian colleague when I met him last year in Bangkok. We were having a discussion about Indonesia's...

Australia's Great Barrier Reef threatened by coal mining

Blog entry by Arpana Udupa | April 20, 2013

Image: Darren Jew/Greenpeace I joined the Rainbow Warrior III in Townsville, a city in the north-eastern coast of Queensland, Australia. After catching up with my Australian counterparts on the campaign and tour, I found myself in a...

APP to end deforestation!

Blog entry by Nandikesh Sivalinagam | February 12, 2013

Last May, on a hot mid-summer day, I remember standing with some Greenpeace activists in orang-utan suits outside KFC outlets in Connaught place, Delhi. Our demand to KFC and their parent company YUM was "stop buying packaging material...

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