Ending deforestation

Indonesia's rainforests shelter an amazingly rich number of plant and animal species, many of which occur nowhere else on earth. The orang-utan, Sumatran tiger and the world's largest flower, the one metre Wide Rafflesia, all call the Paradise Forests their home. The human communities inhabiting these forests have deep cultural, spiritual and physical connections to the forest for thousands of years. The diversity of these cultures is extraordinary.

Indonesia is now the world’s third largest greenhouse gas emitter, after China and the US, despite its relatively small area and population.  Deforestation and peat land destruction are the reasons why – up to four percent of global greenhouse gases  are estimated to come from the destruction of Indonesia’s peat lands. The palm oil industry is acknowledged as one of the primary drivers of deforestation and peat destruction, along with the pulp paper and mining industries.

Palm oil is used as cheap cooking oil and in most processed foods (chocolates, ice creams, instant foods, baked goods etc), in cosmetics, soaps and a number of other products. India has emerged as a key market for Indonesian palm oil, surpassing China as the world’s largest importer in 2009. Indian demand for this commodity is spurring expansion of plantations into forest and peat land areas.

As part of its campaign towards zero deforestation, Greenpeace is calling for a moratorium on all deforestation and peat land destruction in Indonesia, and is asking all companies purchasing palm oil to sever links with suppliers known to be involved in deforestation and peat land destruction.

Campaign story

Globally, a string of large corporations including Unilever, Kraft, Mars and Nestle have made commitments to sustainable palm oil sourcing in response to public pressure over the issue of deforestation and peat land destruction.

In India, Greenpeace is asking all importers of palm oil to ensure that their supplies are not linked to deforestation or peat destruction, and to support a moratorium on forest clearance in Indonesia. It is essential that Indian companies and the Indian public let Indonesian producers know that they do not want palm oil that is linked to deforestation or peat destruction. Under a moratorium, the palm oil industry is free to continue operations on existing plantations, and expand in non-forest areas. But deforestation and peat destruction must stop.

The latest updates

 

When humans take over. The story of Uttrakhand

Blog entry by Bipasha Majumder | January 16, 2013

Imagine a place with green rugged hills, deep valleys, sparkling blue rivers, apple and cherry orchards, sleepy little towns and villages and friendly and humble people. Travel further up and let this place open up to the ever...

Will KFC boss give us the nuggets we need or just more salad dressing?

Blog entry by Rolf Skar, Greenpeace USA | October 24, 2012

KFC recently uploaded a new statement to their website called “ Sustainable Sourcing and Waste Recovery ”. It looked like this could - if properly taken further - be the start of KFC’s response to the campaign that has seen hundreds...

The future of the Amazon uncertain

Blog entry by Jessica Miller | October 22, 2012

For ten years, the fate of Brazil’s forests have hung in the balance as the future of the Forest Code has been up for grabs. We’ve see the debate over the law come to a head over the last few years, as the agribusiness sector...

Frying the Forest

Publication | September 26, 2012 at 13:59

How india’s use of palm oil is having a devastating impact on indonesia’s rainforests, tigers and the global climate

How coal mining is trashing tigerland

Publication | August 1, 2012 at 16:35

This report makes the case that the biggest threat to the long term survival of the Royal Bengal Tiger in its largest contiguous landscape- Central India- has been overlooked by the Indian government and its administrative machinery. That threat...

Global protests grow as KFC bosses sit in stunned silence

Blog entry by Bustar Maitar | June 8, 2012

The past 10 days have seen a growing chorus of protests aimed at KFC’s destructive packaging while the company has remained totally silent over what action it will take to cut the infamous Asia Pulp and Paper (APP) out of its supply...

Government wants coal, people want forests

Blog entry by Nambie | June 5, 2012

"Jungle toh munshi ka hain." These words stayed with me throughout and even after my stay in Singrauli, the so called energy capital of the country. We travelled to Singrauli, deep inside the Mahan forest to bear witness to the...

Timber ripping is the truth

Blog entry by Nandikesh Sivalingam | June 4, 2012

People walking around in Orangutan suits, in a busy commercial area, is not a usual sight. It's funny at first, but then you realise that they are probably doing all of this for a reason. For the Greenpeace activists in these...

Latest:KFC campaign goes global

Blog entry by Bustar Maitar | May 28, 2012

This week saw the launch of new global campaign to stop KFC turning rainforests into trash, by cutting deforestation out of it’s supply chain. All week Greenpeace activists have been taking the message to KFC while thousands of...

KFC executives have their heads in a bucket

Blog entry by Chris Eaton | May 24, 2012

Yesterday we released a report exposing KFC for driving rainforest destruction and pushing tigers toward extinction. Sadly, KFC executives have responded by putting a big bucket of denial on their heads. KFC Packaging...

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