Ending deforestation

Indonesia's rainforests shelter an amazingly rich number of plant and animal species, many of which occur nowhere else on earth. The orang-utan, Sumatran tiger and the world's largest flower, the one metre Wide Rafflesia, all call the Paradise Forests their home. The human communities inhabiting these forests have deep cultural, spiritual and physical connections to the forest for thousands of years. The diversity of these cultures is extraordinary.

Indonesia is now the world’s third largest greenhouse gas emitter, after China and the US, despite its relatively small area and population.  Deforestation and peat land destruction are the reasons why – up to four percent of global greenhouse gases  are estimated to come from the destruction of Indonesia’s peat lands. The palm oil industry is acknowledged as one of the primary drivers of deforestation and peat destruction, along with the pulp paper and mining industries.

Palm oil is used as cheap cooking oil and in most processed foods (chocolates, ice creams, instant foods, baked goods etc), in cosmetics, soaps and a number of other products. India has emerged as a key market for Indonesian palm oil, surpassing China as the world’s largest importer in 2009. Indian demand for this commodity is spurring expansion of plantations into forest and peat land areas.

As part of its campaign towards zero deforestation, Greenpeace is calling for a moratorium on all deforestation and peat land destruction in Indonesia, and is asking all companies purchasing palm oil to sever links with suppliers known to be involved in deforestation and peat land destruction.

Campaign story

Globally, a string of large corporations including Unilever, Kraft, Mars and Nestle have made commitments to sustainable palm oil sourcing in response to public pressure over the issue of deforestation and peat land destruction.

In India, Greenpeace is asking all importers of palm oil to ensure that their supplies are not linked to deforestation or peat destruction, and to support a moratorium on forest clearance in Indonesia. It is essential that Indian companies and the Indian public let Indonesian producers know that they do not want palm oil that is linked to deforestation or peat destruction. Under a moratorium, the palm oil industry is free to continue operations on existing plantations, and expand in non-forest areas. But deforestation and peat destruction must stop.

The latest updates

 

Timber ripping is the truth

Blog entry by Nandikesh Sivalingam | June 4, 2012

People walking around in Orangutan suits, in a busy commercial area, is not a usual sight. It's funny at first, but then you realise that they are probably doing all of this for a reason. For the Greenpeace activists in these...

Latest:KFC campaign goes global

Blog entry by Bustar Maitar | May 28, 2012

This week saw the launch of new global campaign to stop KFC turning rainforests into trash, by cutting deforestation out of it’s supply chain. All week Greenpeace activists have been taking the message to KFC while thousands of...

KFC executives have their heads in a bucket

Blog entry by Chris Eaton | May 24, 2012

Yesterday we released a report exposing KFC for driving rainforest destruction and pushing tigers toward extinction. Sadly, KFC executives have responded by putting a big bucket of denial on their heads. KFC Packaging...

KFC’s Secret Recipe: Rainforest Destruction

Blog entry by Ian Duff | May 24, 2012

No matter what you think about fast food, you’ll no doubt agree that rainforests shouldn’t be trashed to make packaging destined for the trash. But  that’s exactly what’s happening. Asia Pulp & Paper (APP) is supplying KFC with...

Junking the Jungle

Publication | May 21, 2012 at 20:14

Greenpeace International research has revealed that KFC is sourcing paper for its packaging products from rainforests. This has been confirmed in China, the UK and Indonesia. Products found to contain rainforest fibre include cups, food boxes,...

Tigers reach coal ministry's office

Image gallery | December 1, 2011

Bhaloo and Sheroo welcome you to Junglistan

Blog entry by Brikesh Singh | November 28, 2011

Bear necessities Life can be difficult for a bear, especially when you are in the city. You might be wondering what am I doing here and before you jump to any conclusions, let me tell you my story.  Firstly and most importantly...

Kicked out of Indonesia for fighting APP's deforestation

Blog entry by Andy Tait, Greenpeace UK | October 25, 2011

Until last Wednesday, I was in Indonesia. I'd travelled there to work with colleagues in Jakarta and Sumatra on our continuing campaign to end the devastation of the country's magnificent rainforests. A Greenpeace activist...

Barred from Indonesia for working in support of president’s efforts to stop deforestation

Blog entry by John Sauven | October 18, 2011

I’ve been working with Greenpeace for more than 20 years and until now I had never been deported from any country. Until last week, that is, when I tried to enter Indonesia to spend time with our staff in Jakarta in support of their...

“These are not good times for an orangutan.”

Blog entry by Pooja Tanna | October 10, 2011

I belong to the rainforests in Indonesia but circumstances forced me to come down to the concrete jungle of Mumbai in India. I am an orangutan, which means ‘person of the forest’ in Malay! Everything was fine, till some humans started...

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