Ending deforestation

Indonesia's rainforests shelter an amazingly rich number of plant and animal species, many of which occur nowhere else on earth. The orang-utan, Sumatran tiger and the world's largest flower, the one metre Wide Rafflesia, all call the Paradise Forests their home. The human communities inhabiting these forests have deep cultural, spiritual and physical connections to the forest for thousands of years. The diversity of these cultures is extraordinary.

Indonesia is now the world’s third largest greenhouse gas emitter, after China and the US, despite its relatively small area and population.  Deforestation and peat land destruction are the reasons why – up to four percent of global greenhouse gases  are estimated to come from the destruction of Indonesia’s peat lands. The palm oil industry is acknowledged as one of the primary drivers of deforestation and peat destruction, along with the pulp paper and mining industries.

Palm oil is used as cheap cooking oil and in most processed foods (chocolates, ice creams, instant foods, baked goods etc), in cosmetics, soaps and a number of other products. India has emerged as a key market for Indonesian palm oil, surpassing China as the world’s largest importer in 2009. Indian demand for this commodity is spurring expansion of plantations into forest and peat land areas.

As part of its campaign towards zero deforestation, Greenpeace is calling for a moratorium on all deforestation and peat land destruction in Indonesia, and is asking all companies purchasing palm oil to sever links with suppliers known to be involved in deforestation and peat land destruction.

Campaign story

Globally, a string of large corporations including Unilever, Kraft, Mars and Nestle have made commitments to sustainable palm oil sourcing in response to public pressure over the issue of deforestation and peat land destruction.

In India, Greenpeace is asking all importers of palm oil to ensure that their supplies are not linked to deforestation or peat destruction, and to support a moratorium on forest clearance in Indonesia. It is essential that Indian companies and the Indian public let Indonesian producers know that they do not want palm oil that is linked to deforestation or peat destruction. Under a moratorium, the palm oil industry is free to continue operations on existing plantations, and expand in non-forest areas. But deforestation and peat destruction must stop.

The latest updates

 

Good afternoon. How much for a forest?

Blog entry by Grace Boyle | January 25, 2011

The floatation of Coal India was a smasher. Bigger than anyone could have dreamed. The Government of India launched the initial public offering (IPO) of Coal India Ltd, the state-owned coal mining company that is the largest in the...

It took just eight weeks for Nestlé

Image | May 26, 2010 at 17:11

It took just eight weeks for Nestlé to answer our demands, thanks to pressure from Greenpeace supporters around the world.

Nestle needs to give rainforests ‘a break’

Feature story | March 17, 2010 at 4:30

Need a break? Before you have one with a Kit Kat watch this video – ‘Have a break?’ We need your help to get the rainforests a break and to help you spread the word we’ve launched this video spoof. It exposes the true cost behind having a break...

Greenpeace staff member wins alternative Nobel Prize

Feature story | October 13, 2009 at 23:24

KINSHASA, Congo, The Democratic Republic of The — We are thrilled to announce that one of our staff members, René Ngongo, has today been named a recipient of the 2009 Right Livelihood award.

Day out with Nestlé

Feature story | October 10, 2009 at 11:45

On October 8, 2009, Today, Greenpeace activists and consumers gathered at Nestlé House at Gurgaon, Haryana, India asking an unresponsive Nestlé what they have to say to 28,000 odd Indian consumers who have written in asking if Nestlé will...

A Greenpeace volunteer dressed in a costume

Image | October 8, 2009 at 3:30

A Greenpeace volunteer dressed in a costume depicting a Nestle product holds up messages from over 40,000 of Nestle's own customers in front of Nestle house, in Gurgaon. Greenpeace volunteers today delivered anti-GM messages on behalf of more...

A Greenpeace volunteer dressed in a costume

Image | October 8, 2009 at 3:30

A Greenpeace volunteer dressed in a costume depicting a Nestle product, holds a banner that say "Will Nestle always be GM free?" in Hindi and messages from over 40,000 of Nestle's own customers in front of Nestle house, in Gurgaon. Greenpeace...

Greenpeace volunteers dressed in costumes

Image | October 8, 2009 at 3:30

Greenpeace volunteers dressed in costumes depicting Nestle products, hold banners that say "Arrest Genetic Contamination" in front of Nestle house, in Gurgaon. Greenpeace volunteers today delivered anti-GM messages on behalf of more than 40,500...

GM in Indian foods: Greenpeace flags the good and the bad

Feature story | September 8, 2009 at 3:30

NEW DELHI, India — Eleven major food companies in India have been slotted in a ‘red list’, compiled by Greenpeace India, in the country’s first safe food guide on Genetically Modified ingredients.

Climate change threatens one billion with drought

Feature story | August 28, 2009 at 3:30

BEIJING, China — One hundred ice children melting in the sun of a Beijing summer.

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