Ending deforestation

Indonesia's rainforests shelter an amazingly rich number of plant and animal species, many of which occur nowhere else on earth. The orang-utan, Sumatran tiger and the world's largest flower, the one metre Wide Rafflesia, all call the Paradise Forests their home. The human communities inhabiting these forests have deep cultural, spiritual and physical connections to the forest for thousands of years. The diversity of these cultures is extraordinary.

Indonesia is now the world’s third largest greenhouse gas emitter, after China and the US, despite its relatively small area and population.  Deforestation and peat land destruction are the reasons why – up to four percent of global greenhouse gases  are estimated to come from the destruction of Indonesia’s peat lands. The palm oil industry is acknowledged as one of the primary drivers of deforestation and peat destruction, along with the pulp paper and mining industries.

Palm oil is used as cheap cooking oil and in most processed foods (chocolates, ice creams, instant foods, baked goods etc), in cosmetics, soaps and a number of other products. India has emerged as a key market for Indonesian palm oil, surpassing China as the world’s largest importer in 2009. Indian demand for this commodity is spurring expansion of plantations into forest and peat land areas.

As part of its campaign towards zero deforestation, Greenpeace is calling for a moratorium on all deforestation and peat land destruction in Indonesia, and is asking all companies purchasing palm oil to sever links with suppliers known to be involved in deforestation and peat land destruction.

Campaign story

Globally, a string of large corporations including Unilever, Kraft, Mars and Nestle have made commitments to sustainable palm oil sourcing in response to public pressure over the issue of deforestation and peat land destruction.

In India, Greenpeace is asking all importers of palm oil to ensure that their supplies are not linked to deforestation or peat destruction, and to support a moratorium on forest clearance in Indonesia. It is essential that Indian companies and the Indian public let Indonesian producers know that they do not want palm oil that is linked to deforestation or peat destruction. Under a moratorium, the palm oil industry is free to continue operations on existing plantations, and expand in non-forest areas. But deforestation and peat destruction must stop.

The latest updates

 

Greenpeace activists in gear pose along with

Image | April 13, 2007 at 18:53

Greenpeace activists in gear pose along with an Ice Installation of the "Sustainable Energy Outlook for India" to fight climate change and sustain development.A Greenpeace delegation today met the Prime Minister to present the Report which was...

Cargill's controversial soya port closed in the Amazon

Feature story | April 9, 2007 at 3:30

SANTARÉM, Brazil — In the heart of the Amazon rainforest a huge soya port owned by the giant US company Cargill has just been closed down by the Brazilian Environmental Agency (IBAMA). The orders to close the port came after a seven-year...

“Nuclear Energy = Dangerous Energy”

Feature story | April 9, 2007 at 3:30

JAKARTA, Indonesia — Greenpeace activists today picketed the high-profile’ IndoNuclear 2007’ conference In Jakarta, with banners proclaiming : “Nuclear Energy = Dangerous Energy” to protest against the false and dangerous solutions being...

One for the record books

Feature story | March 16, 2007 at 14:10

JAKARTA, Indonesia — Indonesia destroys about 51 square kilometers of forests every day, equivalent to 300 football fields every hour -- a figure, which should earn the country a place in the Guinness Book of World Records as the world's...

Greenpeace to MoF: Revoke All License to Kill Indonesia's Forest

Feature story | December 11, 2006 at 4:30

JAKARTA, Indonesia — Twenty three Greenpeace activists were arrested and detained by Indonesian police for a non-violent protest held at the Ministry of Forestry this morning. They are being charged with “unpleasant action” which carries fines...

Globe warms: rainforests burn

Feature story | September 22, 2006 at 13:51

In what is becoming an annual event, fires are sweeping through the tropical rainforests of Indonesia and Brazil. The burning of the rainforests not only threaten biodiversity in the affected areas but, by contributing towards climate change,...

A Greenpeace team has investigated and documented

Image | August 24, 2006 at 4:30

A Greenpeace team has investigated and documented the forest fires in Sumatra, Indonesia, which have now become an annual phenomenon, thanks to the effects of unsustainable logging, and are the cause of a thick smog-like haze over the entire...

Greenpeace Activists in Brazil Block Cargill Soy Facility

Feature story | May 31, 2006 at 3:30

After two years of investigation, we’ve uncovered a string of illegal soy production that is destroying the Amazon rainforest, and can be traced to a large American corporation: Cargill.

KFC frying the Amazon as violence erupts

Feature story | May 22, 2006 at 12:35

We don’t think the Amazon should be cut down for chicken feed. Our investigative report, 'Eating up the Amazon' showed how soya beans grown in the Amazon were going into McDonald’s McNuggets. Well guess what? Soy grown by clearing the...

Greenpeace sting exposes pirate loggers

Feature story | January 5, 2006 at 16:25

How do you get a shipment of illegal logs out of the Amazon and to market in São Paolo? A team of Greenpeace activists risked their lives to go undercover to show -- for the first time -- exactly how it's done.

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