Ending deforestation

Indonesia's rainforests shelter an amazingly rich number of plant and animal species, many of which occur nowhere else on earth. The orang-utan, Sumatran tiger and the world's largest flower, the one metre Wide Rafflesia, all call the Paradise Forests their home. The human communities inhabiting these forests have deep cultural, spiritual and physical connections to the forest for thousands of years. The diversity of these cultures is extraordinary.

Indonesia is now the world’s third largest greenhouse gas emitter, after China and the US, despite its relatively small area and population.  Deforestation and peat land destruction are the reasons why – up to four percent of global greenhouse gases  are estimated to come from the destruction of Indonesia’s peat lands. The palm oil industry is acknowledged as one of the primary drivers of deforestation and peat destruction, along with the pulp paper and mining industries.

Palm oil is used as cheap cooking oil and in most processed foods (chocolates, ice creams, instant foods, baked goods etc), in cosmetics, soaps and a number of other products. India has emerged as a key market for Indonesian palm oil, surpassing China as the world’s largest importer in 2009. Indian demand for this commodity is spurring expansion of plantations into forest and peat land areas.

As part of its campaign towards zero deforestation, Greenpeace is calling for a moratorium on all deforestation and peat land destruction in Indonesia, and is asking all companies purchasing palm oil to sever links with suppliers known to be involved in deforestation and peat land destruction.

Campaign story

Globally, a string of large corporations including Unilever, Kraft, Mars and Nestle have made commitments to sustainable palm oil sourcing in response to public pressure over the issue of deforestation and peat land destruction.

In India, Greenpeace is asking all importers of palm oil to ensure that their supplies are not linked to deforestation or peat destruction, and to support a moratorium on forest clearance in Indonesia. It is essential that Indian companies and the Indian public let Indonesian producers know that they do not want palm oil that is linked to deforestation or peat destruction. Under a moratorium, the palm oil industry is free to continue operations on existing plantations, and expand in non-forest areas. But deforestation and peat destruction must stop.

The latest updates

 

2005 Rewound

Feature story | January 5, 2006 at 4:30

A look back over the last twelve months, starring jaguar suited activists, corporate skulduggery and heroics in unequal measures, politicians' finding/losing the plot and even an embassy for whales.

Time is Running Out!

Feature story | December 2, 2005 at 8:27

BANGALORE, India — The UN Climate Change Conference in Montreal is underway. The climate summit - the first since the Kyoto Protocol entered into force - opened on the 28th of November, kicking off two weeks of crucial negotiations on climate...

Sir, Isn't Your solution the Problem?

Feature story | October 15, 2005 at 3:30

BANGALORE, India — Ask the leaders of world, if you have all the 'solutions' then why would more people in the world go hungry today than 20 years ago?

Jaguars roar into action

Feature story | September 5, 2005 at 15:45

SALTA PROVINCE, Argentina — In Argentina precious forest is being bulldozed at a rate of a soccer pitch area every three minutes - all for soya crops to feed pigs and chickens in Europe and China. We are out to stop this destruction with the...

Illegal log shipment blocked

Feature story | March 23, 2005 at 4:30

PORTO, Portugal — The cargo ship Skyman had nearly made its delivery of more than a quarter million US dollars worth of illegal Amazonian logs. Nearly. But as it sailed into Portugal, Greenpeace activists rappelled from a bridge at the port...

Nun assassinated defending Amazon

Feature story | February 13, 2005 at 4:30

ANAPU, PARA STATE, Brazil — 74 year old American missionary Sister Dorothy Stang was assassinated on Saturday in the Amazon state of Para, Brazil. Sister Dorothy was travelling to a sustainable development project in Anapu with some colleagues...

Monsanto pays fine for bribery

Feature story | January 11, 2005 at 4:30

What do you do if you're trying to plant genetically engineered cotton in a hurry, but the government wants to make sure there won't be any environmental damage from doing so? If you're the giant Monsanto corporation, one answer might be: bribe...

Tsunami and the environment

Feature story | January 10, 2005 at 4:30

On December 26 a massive tsunami swept through the Indian Ocean region to become arguably the largest natural disaster in living memory. Questions are now being asked: what are the environmental impacts of this tragedy? Did damaged environments...

Rainbow Warrior aids tsunami survivors

Feature story | January 3, 2005 at 4:30

SUMATRA, Indonesia — Our ship, the Rainbow Warrior, is helping medical aid organisation Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) to get relief supplies to parts of Indonesia devastated by the Indian Ocean earthquake.

Peace Prize goes green

Feature story | October 8, 2004 at 3:30

NAIROBI, Kenya — Wangari Maathai has planted tens of millions of trees, opposed genetically modified organisms and titanium mining in her native Kenya, and won numerous awards for her environmental activism. She has also been beaten, harassed,...

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